A Lingering Look at Windows: Historical Lewes, Sussex

For this week’s Lingering Look at Windows challenge over at Dawn’s site, The Day After,  I have been inspired by short bursts of time spent by Hubby and I in the delightfully historic town of Lewes in the south east of England.

Lewes is nestled comfortably within the chalky South Downs of East Sussex with the River Ouse running prettily through it.  Pretty yes, although prone to flooding from time to time. Let’s hope not this time.

So much could be said about this town which dates as far back as prehistoric times.  It oozes history but I will keep it short.

Windows of Lewes (c) Sherri Matthews 2013

Windows of Lewes
(c) Sherri Matthews 2013

For one thing, Lewes boasts its very own castle as well as the remains of Lewes Priory, both of which date as far back as Saxon times. For another, it was the site of the Battle of Lewes between Henry III and Simon de Montfort in 1264.

Another interesting fact is that should you ever visit Lewes, you might come across a former windmill called ‘The Round House’ which was once owned by Virginia Woolf.  Who knew?

‘Harveys Brewery’, which sits by the river, was founded in 1790 and is famous for its Sussex Best Bitter (strong ale!) which, to this day, is distributed to pubs throughout East Sussex. I’m not a bitter drinker but I have it by good authority that it is a very good bitter indeed.

Harveys Brewery, Lewes, East Sussex (c) Sherri Matthews 2014

Harveys Brewery, Lewes, East Sussex
(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

Lewes is, of course, best known for the ‘Lewes Bonfire’, held every 5th November. Celebrations are held in honour of the failed attempt of the Gunpowder Plot in 1605 by the Catholic Guy Fawkes and also in memory of the seventeen Protestant Martyrs who were burned at the stake in Lewes as part of the Marian Persecutions held between 1555 and 1557.

Controversially, a large effigy of the Pope is burned on a huge bonfire on this night and parades take place throughout the town as various ‘Bonfire Societies’ are represented. Think people parading through the streets with crosses on fire and that kind of thing.   It is the biggest and most famous celebration of Bonfire Night in the country.

All a bit ‘Wicker Man-ish’ for me, I have to say. (Although I do love that film. The 1973 one with Edward Woodward, not ‘that’ awful one with Nicholas Cage…)

Sadly, in December 1836, an avalanche occurred in Lewes, the worse that Britain has ever experienced. Heavy snow which had accumulated on a nearby cliff came crashing down on top of a row of houses on a street now known as South Street.  Fifteen people were buried, eight of whom died.

Today, there is a pub in South Street called ‘The Snowdrop’, so named in memory of this tragic event.  (I thought it was named after the flower). Eldest son told me this sobering bit of information during our first visit to this pub. (Highly recommended for excellent food, surroundings and vibe, by-the-way).  

Windows at the back of The Snowdrop pub in Lewes, Sussex. Notice the chalk cliffs behind it. Taken in late summer, 2013 (c) Sherri Matthews 2014

Windows at the back of The Snowdrop pub in Lewes, Sussex.
Notice the chalk cliffs behind it. Taken in late summer, 2013
(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

However, for me, and since I am fascinated by all things medieval and especially King Henry VIII’s reign, I was delighted to discover a fifteenth century timber-framed Wealden hall house known as Anne of Cleves house. It was left to her as part of her divorce settlement from King Henry VIII, although she never actually lived there. It is now managed by the Sussex Archaeological Society and is a museum.  

Windows of 15th Century Anne of Cleves House, Lewes, Sussex (c) Sherri Matthews 2014

Windows of 15th Century Anne of Cleves House, Lewes, Sussex
(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

I have always felt that out of all of Henry’s wives, and despite her initial disappointments, Anne of Cleves came out the best.   After all, she was only actually married to him from 6 January 1540 to 9 July 1540.  Thomas Cromwell ‘found’ her for the King, living as she did in Germany, after Jane Seymour’s death and promptly commissioned Hans Holbein, a German artist, to paint a portrait of her, making sure to present her in the best possible light (no Photoshop or air brushing in those days, remember).

However, upon setting eyes on Anne in the flesh and noticing that she looked decidedly different to her portrait (a bit like online dating methinks, medieval style), Henry was not impressed, famously declaring, ‘I like her not’.  Perhaps he should have learnt a little German and got to know her a bit better first…

By that time, and unfortunately for him, Henry had no choice but to marry her but being ever impatient, rushed through an annulment on the basis that the marriage was never consummated.  Lucky Anne!

She was packed off to Hever Castle in Kent, the Boleyn family home and given a generous allowance as well as other properties, including Anne of Cleves House.  Known from then on and rather fondly as ‘The King’s beloved sister’, Anne was comfortable and well looked after with respect and kindness, living as a friend to both Henry and his children.

She must have missed her family in Germany terribly, yet she remained in England for the rest of her days until her death at the age of 41 on 17 July, 1557, in so doing surviving old King Henry and being the last of his queens to die.

More importantly, she got to keep her head which is more than can be said for most of King Henry’s other unfortunate wives.

About Sherri Matthews

Sherri has been writing full time since 2011. Currently working on her memoir, 'Stranger in a White Dress', she has been published in a variety of national magazines, websites and three anthologies. Sherri raised her three, now adult children, in California for twenty years and today, lives in England’s West Country with her hubby, Aspie youngest, two cats, a grumpy bunny and a family of Chinese Button Quails. She keeps out of mischief blogging, gardening, walking by the sea and snapping endless photographs. Her garden robin muse vists regularly.
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90 Responses to A Lingering Look at Windows: Historical Lewes, Sussex

  1. idiotwriter says:

    These old English towns really are pretty

    Like

  2. Wonderful post, Sherri. I’m a fan of Tudor information, so I know “both” Annes, Boelyn and the Anne of Cleaves. I loved learning about Woolf’s ‘Round House’ and Bonfire Night and the 1836 avalanche. Excellent details, and the windows–especially in the first and last pictures–were a delight. I’m a big fan of windows!!!

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh, you too eh Marylin? I’ve been fascinated with all things Tudor since I was about 12! I was so excited when I discovered Anne of Cleves’ house, can’t wait to go back when it is open from March onwards and I will be sure to take more pics!
      So glad you enjoyed the windows too, something else we share, thanks Marylin 🙂

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  3. Heyjude says:

    An excellent history lesson Sherri, built around some lovely windows. I have driven through Lewes a few times, but never stopped and looked around although I have always thought it an attractive town. Maybe next time I am back in that part of the country I will make more effort to stop and wander (and have lunch at the Snowdrop) 🙂
    Jude xx

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    • Sherri says:

      Thanks Jude! So glad you enjoyed it. You must visit Lewes, you would love it. The shopping is really interesting, lost of unique shops and lovely cafes and restaurants. In particular, there is a very old fashioned pet shop which is worth a visit in and of itself. And yes, you absolutely must go to The Snowdrop. It is at the end of a residential street and it is amazing to see the chalk cliffs looming up behind it in the background. It feels more like Austria, with the chalk being snow… 😉 xx

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  4. Denise says:

    Almost screaming with delight at opening up my blog reader and recognising *that house* from Lewes. It’s a gorgeous colour, isn’t it? I’m ashamed to say I don’t have such good pictures – isn’t it strange how you take things for granted when they are so available.

    I didn’t know all that about Anne of Cleves and it’s nice to know that at least one of his poor wives managed to escape from it OK.

    I think you really captured the spirit of the town!

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    • Sherri says:

      Well Denise, you know I had you uppermost in my mind when I wrote this post!!! Ha ha! So you know ‘that house’ too!! Yes, what a beautiful colour, oh I would love to live there! We were just walking around and I happened to take a few pics as I always do. Much to the annoyance to family but now I have the perfect excuse by saying ‘it’s for my blog’!!!
      I’m looking forward to visiting Anne of Cleves’ house once it opens from March onwards.
      Yes, I know what you mean about taking things for granted when they are on our own doorstep. I hope I did Lewes proud, although there is so much more to write about this amazing town…I love it 🙂

      Like

  5. Oh how I wish you were my History teacher when I was in school, Sherri. Your lessons are so much more fun! I love the colorful buildings and the flowers at the Snowdrop pub…magnificent! Derek from Devon loved this post as well…beautiful!

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    • Sherri says:

      Oooh, not too sure what kind of a teacher I would make though Jill! You know, I used to detest history in middle school but by the time I went to high school my teacher made it so interesting and I ended up loving it.
      All my kids love history, my eldest took his degree in history. I am obsessed with that old fox Henry VIII though I have to admit 😉 Mind you, what I wrote here in this post is very, very basic…
      Yes, back in the summer most of our towns and pubs look like this, cascading hanging baskets everywhere which is lovely.
      Thanks so much Jill, so glad to know that you and Derek from Devon both enjoyed this 🙂 One of these days you will both have to come over for a visit and we can go to The Snowdrop for a pint, cheers 🙂

      Like

  6. I loved the way you used the photos as the segue for the social studies/history lesson, Sherri. Delightful post–thank you.

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    • Sherri says:

      Well, I do enjoy sharing little snippets of what I hope will be interesting info to others, so inclined and I am a bit of geek when it comes to old Henry VIII! Thanks so much Nav, glad you enjoyed… 🙂

      Like

  7. lilkaraphael says:

    Sherri, I thoroughly enjoyed that post and learned quite a bit as well! Your pictures are beautiful 🙂

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  8. That top photo looks like where I live, in America.

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  9. Ain’t love or King Henry quaint? 😀
    Hated history till I started making some of my own. Now I can’t get enough of it. Ha ha.
    Wonder and informative post, Sherri. Love the architecture here.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Ha Ha!!! Gotta love that old fox King Henry, and yes, I am rather obsessed with him, no apologies here, lol 😉
      Oh Tess love, that..”till I started making some of my own’, ha!! Well, isn’t that the best history of all to write about??? Oh yes…
      Thanks so much, always so glad to know that you enjoyed reading 🙂

      Like

  10. Kristin says:

    Sherri, you’ve got to be kidding me! My friends live in Lewes and I spent a wonderful weekend with them in 2011. I have to admit, though, that all the history went right past me… Shame on me! Probably I was just too excited to spend time with my friends whom I hadn’t seen in ages.
    As always, it was a delight to read your beautiful and most informative post, thank you!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      NO WAY Kristin!! How crazy is that?? What a small world indeed…and I can fully understand you just wanting to enjoy the weekend hanging out with your friends while you were there and lovely to know you had such a wonderful time while doing so!
      The history will always be there, for another time for when you visit your friends again 🙂
      I’m a bit of a geek when it comes to old Henry and anything to do with him, so when I happened to find the Anne of Cleves house right there in Lewes I was so excited!!
      I know, sad isn’t it!
      So glad you enjoyed this post Kristin, thanks so much… 🙂

      Like

  11. Wonderful post. I’ve never been to Lewes but enjoyed reading about it! Great photos too.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thanks so much Brenda, so glad you enjoyed it. Lewes is a fascinating place to visit if you are ever in Sussex. It is packed full of history, if you like that sort of thing 🙂

      Like

  12. thirdhandart says:

    Love the lingering look at windows in the town of Lewes Sherri! The historical architecture, as well as the short history lesson, was very interesting. Would love to tour the Anne of Cleves house museum… someday. Hope the River Ouse hasn’t flooded this beautiful, quaint town.

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh, yes, thanks so much Theresa, my son was telling me that before Christmas the river did flood somewhat but Lewes was actually very badly flooded some years ago and since then there have have been major flood prevention steps taken to prevent it from happening again. Many homes and businesses were ruined. The River Ouse is a fast moving, meandering river (will post photos and more of Lewes in due course, also of the museum when we get a chance to visit) so I can see how devastating it would be to flood like that again.
      So glad you enjoyed this post, and if you ever come to England, I will happily take you to Anne of Cleves house, and then we can go for tea at a delightfully quaint tea room right by the river…I know just the very place… 😉

      Like

  13. pommepal says:

    Very interesting post Sherri. The detail added to your photos. Being Australian my eyes went straight to that amazing crocodile sculpture on the pub wall. Do you know if there is a story behind that?

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    • Sherri says:

      Hello Pommepal, thank you so much for dropping by, and so glad that you enjoyed this post. Ha! Yes, isn’t that crocodile sculpture something? I need to ask my son about that and just what it is, if not I will look it up and get back to you on that! I’m just as curious as you are! I’ll be back… 🙂

      Like

  14. This is a wonderful biopic and the associated photgraphs are stunning – it’s like breathing in the atmosphere of this quaint East Sussex town! And i can affirm the Harvey’s ale is excellent!! Brilliant post – enjoyable as always.

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    • Sherri says:

      Ha Ha! Thanks so much and yes, I can testify to that too CM, you certainly did enjoy that Sussex Best Bitter!! A quaint East Sussex town indeed, lovely time spent in Lewes with wonderful people… 🙂 xo

      Like

  15. bulldog says:

    I loved this interesting post… the history is fascinating and there are building s there so old I don’t think they had even discover my country yet… lovely share and great photos of windows…

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    • Sherri says:

      Ha Ha! Thanks so much Bulldog, really glad you enjoyed it. Lewes is indeed fascinating to discover, as I said, it really does ooze history, going right back to first settlements dating back to prehistoric times, never mind all the Roman, Saxon, Medieval and Elizabethan history. The shopping area down by the river is delightful, full of very unique and individual shops, cafes and restaurants, as well as the pubs too of course 😉

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  16. restlessjo says:

    Thanks for this close up on Lewes, Sherri. 🙂 You obviously know your history and have me wanting to reach for a Philippa Gregory novel. I’m sure she must have one about Anne. Nice of them to celebrate my birthday in such style (Nov 5th) I’m inclined to want to join Jude there in the Snowdrop. Such a pretty courtyard.
    You’d like Durham too! I haven’t done it justice in my windows post because I’ve written about it many times before.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Jo, thanks so much for dropping by, so glad you enjoyed this. Yes, I am a big fan of that old fox King Henry VIII. Oh yes, nothing like a Philippa Gregory novel to snuggle down with! I’ve really enjoyed reading all of Alison Weir’s books, especially The Six Wives of Henry VIII. I would definitely recommend it. She also wrote a fabulous book called The Princes in the Tower. I was thrilled when Richard’s skeleton was discovered in Leicester! I am a geek when it comes to all this stuff!!
      Yes, your birthday would definitely go off with a bang in Lewes, no doubt about that and The Snowdrop would be a great place to celebrate it 🙂
      I really loved your photos of Durham, it’s a place I really hope to visit one of these days. I have family in Cheshire, but it’s been a long time since I’ve been ‘up north’. Really must get up there…

      Like

      • restlessjo says:

        I was busy reminiscing the Algarve, Sherri, but I seem to be off on a north eastern jaunt at present. I spent the morning in a museum which would be right up your street if you ever come in this direction. There’ll be a post (or 3- not good at moderation!)
        Thanks for the book recommend. I’ll look out for it. 🙂

        Like

        • Sherri says:

          Not been to the Algarve but I have friends who go every year. It is definitely on the ever-expanding list as a ‘must-do’!
          Looking forward to your museum posts, wonderful! Yes, do look out for that book Jo, I’ve read it a few times and find something fascinating in it every time 🙂

          Like

  17. jenniferkmarsh says:

    What a lovely old place Lewes seems! So much history in our isles, I love it.

    Regarding Henry VIII – love it! I’m such a geek with certain areas of history. I don’t know how much you know about Henry VIII, but he was actually a very much desired man in his youth! Totally a medieval heartthrob, so I’ve read. They believe he went so mad regarding wives and such because he contracted syphilis, and over time that can affect the brain, hence a possible reason for his ruthless ways. This would also be why he didn’t exactly get on well with having children – it wasn’t the woman’s fault at all, but rather his.

    History, ‘eh. Gotta love it.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Oh Jennifer, well, you and I are both geeks together then, because I have been obsessed with that old fox King Henry VIII for ever!! Yes, he was quite the catch in his young years, and tall too! One thing that also gave him trouble was a hunting injury on one of his legs which never healed properly, ulcerating etc. and he was unable to ride properly eventually because of it, so that’s when he became more and more unfit and of course, very fat! By the time Katherine was his last wife, he was in quite a dreadful state. Of course, they also thought back then that it was the woman who ‘made’ the sex of the baby and so easy to blame them when the required son didn’t emerge. Tough times.
      Love, love love it! Glad you do too, thanks Jennifer 🙂

      Like

  18. TBM says:

    Woolf owned a windmill–that seems random to me. Um did I see a pub in the photos. Um, you didn’t invite me! Lovely post and have a great weekend.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Yes, I had to put that in, I discovered that little bit of random information about Woolf owning a windmill quite by chance. Very strange, and I intend to look this windmill out when next in Lewes, and take pics of course!!
      And yes TB, that is The Snowdrop, a fantastic pub, you would love it. Ha Ha, next time we go there, I will be sure to let you know… 🙂
      Glad you enjoyed, thanks so much and you have a great weekend too, and hopefully no computer issues… 🙂

      Like

  19. jennypellett says:

    Nice bit of historical background Sherri, and your pictures are great. I remember driving to Lewes years ago during my china painting phase: there used to be a shop on the high street that sold very good, plain white china at a knock down price – just the sort of stuff to practise on. I still have some of it today – some still plain, some decorated and fired!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thanks Jenny, glad you enjoyed it. That is just the kind of shop that is still there in Lewes! I am really looking forward to spending more time there as the shops are very individual and unique in the old part of town down by the river. How interesting that you used to paint china and that you still have some of it today! Have a lovely weekend 🙂

      Like

  20. Steven says:

    Another stellah history lesson 🙂 Lewes looks amazing. Very pretty. What’s most intrigued me is … who knew Virginia Woolf lived in an old windmill? I am now incredibly jealous of her. That’s my lottery dream, that 😉 Plenty to choose from around here.

    I LOVE the look of Anne of Cleaves house. I am a sucker for medieval and Tudor architecture. I am also considering pinching that croc sculpture on the wall of The Snowdrop. Seriously, how amazing is that?

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Hi JG…well, only three days late in replying, but, as my metallic friend would say, ‘I’m back!!’ Hope you had a good weekend. We disappeared to Bournemouth for a friend’s birthday, and was it ever blustery down there!

      So…back to business, and at last able to catch up (I’m sounding like a broken record, I know with this little ‘catchphrase’ – ha – knew you would like that!) and wow, I had no idea about your dream of living in a windmill. You know, I can relate to that because since I was a young girl and we took our annual holidays on the Norfolk Broads, as you well know, I always was fascinated with all those windmills and sort of scared of the old, broken ones. I always remember seeing the ‘windmill house’ when we first headed down river after all the excitement of picking up our boat from the boatyard in Horning and I dreamed so many times of living there!

      Great that you are a fan of Tudor and medieval architecture too and yes, isn’t that crocodile amazing? Will have to find out more about that as per my comment above to pommepal.

      Glad you enjoyed the ‘history lesson’. But I can assure you, I am no teacher… 😉

      Like

      • Steven says:

        Ah, I hope you had a good weekend, despite the bluster. Hope there was no drunkenness or dancing on tables 😉

        Haha, oh yes Sherri, if I won the lottery, I would restore a windmill to live in, and have the Crystal Maze rebuilt. I’m sure they’re on everyone’s to-do list, though.

        As a boy I would be taken out to the Broads most Sundays, and by the time I was about five I knew the names of most of the windmills in the area, off by heart. I do find the broken and derelict ones a bit creepy too, but they’re fascinating. Many have been restored now, though few work; it’s nice to see one actually turn. Horning is lovely 🙂 Berney Arms Mill is impressive, and quite nicely isolated from civilisation.

        I want that crocodile!

        Haha, well it’s clear you’re not a teacher as you always put up with my talking out of turn 😉

        Like

        • Sherri says:

          Ha ha!!! I would be a useless teacher I just know it. Although perhaps with the aid of my magical brolly I might be able to keep a few little darlings in line 🙂

          Yes, Horning is lovely, I love it. Such happy memories of that time… *sighs*

          Will get info on Croc, promise….

          Oh yes, and had a great time thanks. No dancing on tables but did dance. Although at one point a rather sweaty young man started dancing with me and all I will say is that he was a little over-exuberant…now I sort of wished I hadn’t said that…may have to edit later on…;-)

          Like

  21. Interesting post, Sherri. I love your pics of Lewes; a really charming town. There’s not much more important in life than keeping one’s head, so yes, I think Ann really got the best deal, and not having to sleep with old Henry was the cherry on the top. 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thanks Sylvia, so glad you enjoyed it. Lewes is certainly a very charming town indeed, I am looking forward to exploring it again.
      Ha Ha! Love it, and yes, certainly this is why I always felt that ‘lucky Anne’ definitely got the best deal of them all 🙂

      Like

  22. I’ve learned a lot from this post Sherri – beautiful looking place with some very interesting windows. And I’d never heard of the Bonfire celebrations!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you Andrea, so glad you enjoyed it. Yes, the ‘Lewes Bonfire Nights’ are huge there. I’ve never been but my boys have many times and they tell me that it gets ridiculously crowded but an incredible experience. It would make our pathetic firework display held in our back garden look very sorry indeed!
      The Bonfire Societies are very big down there, certain pubs have plaques on their walls signifying which societies they are loyal to and it is all taken very seriously 🙂

      Like

  23. Rachel says:

    It’s so nice to see some of England again, Sherri. I particularly love Anne of Cleves house. And yes, lucky her!

    Like

  24. Glynis Jolly says:

    I really like that one of the pub with all the flowers.

    Like

  25. Great windows but an even better story of Anne of Cleves. Your personal observations made this post most enjoyable.

    Like

  26. JUMBLE in Shanghai sent me. So happy I’m here! Travelling back “home” in May to celebrate 70th birthday parties with friends in Richmond, Surrey, where I used to live. Then…off to St. Leonards for a weeks stay. Will have to take a bus to Lewes to visit. Girlfriend Penny says lots of interesting Art galleries besides historical sites. Can’t wait for May….

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    • Sherri says:

      How lovely to meet you Jots, thanks so much for coming over! What another amazing coincidence, I was born in Kingston-upon-Thames and lived in Richmond briefly 🙂 You will love Lewes, do visit it. Yes, lots of very unique shops and cafes and art galleries. Hopefully by the time you visit in May, we will have dried out by then but I’m sure, no matter what the weather, you will have a super time celebrating such special birthdays 🙂

      Like

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  28. simplyilka says:

    Wonderful post and wonderful pictures! So, Virginia Woolf owned ‘The Round House’? I did not know 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thanks Ilka, so glad enjoyed it! Yes, isn’t that a strange thing to find out about Lewes? I intend to learn more about this 🙂

      Like

      • simplyilka says:

        Yes please, let us know what you learn! BTW, my daughter was Anne of Cleves in a school play last year since she is bilingual and could perform in English and German 🙂

        Like

        • Sherri says:

          I certainly will! Oh how wonderful for your daughter and to be bilingual in English and German too, such a great asset in life. I do so admire this skill. My daughter loved taking German at school and would love to be fluent in it 🙂

          Like

  29. mumblypeg says:

    Loved your post and the fine photos. I look forward to visiting Lewes some day soon. It looks lovely and what a lot of history. Thanks for sharing your time with us. lol M xx

    Like

  30. Beautiful windows with a rich history behind it.

    Like

  31. Great post. It brought back memories of the day when visiting the UK we walked from my husband’s family home in Patcham over theDowns to Lewes. For years he had told me about tiger nuts and we found them there. He hadn’t seen them for years (I’d never seen them) and his joy that day has etchedLewes into my memory.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Small world it is Irene, we pass by Patcham every time we drive down to Brighton to see my boys and of course Lewes is a short drive away. We have taken a few walks along the South Downs. How lovely that you have such wonderful memories of your husband’s joy of your day in Lewes, although I do have to say I haven’t heard of tiger nuts!!!!! Will have to ask around… 😉

      Like

  32. Just wanted to pop back in and let you know that I’ll be thinking of you and sending heartfelt wishes and prayers your way for peaceful, happy, easy, healthy days for you and your whole family.

    Your posts and your photos are beautiful, full of delightful scenes and interesting information. I’m amazed that you find the stamina for such output! I hope you’re enjoying your writing time as much as I enjoy your posts.

    Hugs from Rhode Island.

    I’m daydreaming of the day when we get to do a transatlantic visit. Wouldn’t it be great to have a couple of face-to-face blogging parties, one here, one on your side of the ocean?

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      How lovely of you to pop back in again Tracy and I am really touched by your loving, kind words, thank you so much. Your heartfelt wishes and prayers for me and my family mean the world. Ahh, for those peaceful, happy, easy healthy days…as I wish and pray for you the very same my friend 🙂

      It is so lovely to know that you enjoy my posts and photos so much, your encouragement is wonderful! As for finding the stamina, well, I don’t know either. I just know that writing and blogging helps energize me in a different way to anything else. I have found great enjoyment from the photo challenges I am now doing twice a week. They give me a discipline and I enjoy pondering which photo I’m going to use for each challenge and then the writing comes from that. For the time being anyway it is working for me but I do hope I can keep up with my ‘other’ writing both here and off-blog. So far so good…

      Wouldn’t a both-sides-of-the-Atlantic-real-life blogging party be amazing? Rhode Island is a place I have dreamed of visiting for many years, as I think I’ve mentioned before. I don’t know why, I’ve never been but it’s a place that fascinates me. Interestingly, when my daughter did her 5th grade States assignment, she chose Rhode Island. She was particularly obsessed with chickens at the time (still loves them!) and she loved the name ‘Rhode Island Red’!! We raised a few when she was little! When it came to making a State food though she didn’t want to do clam chowder as she doesn’t like shellfish of any kind so I found a recipe on the internet for potato and sweet corn chowder. It was a huge hit at the school ‘State Fair’ and I still make it to this day on special occasions 🙂

      I’m feeling your big ‘Rhode Island’ hugs, hope you are feeling mine from Somerset 🙂

      Like

  33. What terrific photos–really drew us in. And the history lesson was an unexpected, fun and interesting surprise. Thank you.

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  34. Wow! Can’t tell you how much I loved learning the history of Lewes! Indeed fortunate Anne! You left me going..more, more more! The sign of a good writer!!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thanks so much Diane, really glad you enjoyed it 🙂 Will be visiting the Round House and Anne of Cleves house later in the year and will definitely write more then 🙂 xo

      Like

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