True Calling: Flash Fiction at Carrot Ranch

Blogging and writing is full of adventure isn’t it?  You just never know where it might lead.  For instance, until recently I had no idea what flash fiction was, but since I started taking part in a few challenges here and there, I have developed a real enjoyment of it.

Such are the connections we make,  I have now met Charli who runs a weekly Flash Fiction Challenge over at Carrot Ranch. She gave me a lovely welcome when I jumped on board the wagon train, and there is plenty of room for more!

In sharing some of her family’s history, which runs like the cowboy films I grew up with and so holds a deep fascination for this Brit, Charli has challenged us this week to consider our own history, near or far, and write a flash about it in 99 words, no more, no less.

So many possibilitites, but today one special lady’s story calls out the loudest.

……………………………………………………………..

True Calling

Madeline Dorothy was stubborn and she knew what she wanted to do with her life. Looking after her mother wasn’t it.

Brought up as a Baptist Minister’s daughter, the middle child with two brothers during the tail end of Edwardian Britain, there was every expectation that she would forgo a career and stay at home.

The Roaring Twenties charged in and when Madeline announced that she wanted to pursue a nursing career in London, it did not go down well. She ran away and fulfilled her ambition of nursing sick children.

It was years before Madeline’s mother forgave her.

……………………………………………………………

Madeline Dorothy was my grandmother.  She really did run away to London so that she could train as a nurse, something she always felt called to do.

As a girl, I used to love visiting my granny. We talked for hours, something that continued throughout my life.  I was fascinated about her younger life: how she had lived in Australia for seven years as a young girl when her father took up ministry there and how she had met my grandfather at the hospital where she worked.  For her day, she was older than most (28) when she had her first child, my mother.

Granny never learnt to drive and in her later adult years, right up until she was 92, she rode an adult’s tricycle.  A bad fall put an end to that, and she never recovered from the loss of her only means of independence.

Even when my grandfather left her after 35 years of marriage for her ‘best-friend’, Granny, though devastated, got on with life.  She had to give up her beautiful home and she moved into her flat in Chichester in West Sussex where she lived until the end of her life at the grand old age of 94.

Ironically, when my mother was about 16, my great-grandmother and her sister, my great-aunt, moved into their home (it was a large, Victorian house in the leafy suburbs of Hale, Cheshire with an attic, a cellar, and that lovely summerhouse which so inspired me!).

When grandfather left her, Granny took them both with her to her flat and there the three of them lived, with Granny looking after them until their deaths (86 and 92 respectively).

I remember helping Granny set out their tea trays in the afternoons with tiny milk jugs, sugar bowls with sugar lumps no less and Colclough porcelain cups and saucers. What a life!

My Granny reading to Aspie D - England 1990s (c) Sherri Matthews 2014

My Granny reading to Aspie D – England 1990s
(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

During my visits, just before we were about to eat our evening meal, she would quickly ‘pop’ out with a plate of food covered with a tea-towel for old Mr such-and-such down the road.  The fact that Granny was herself in her 80s was beside the point.

She always seemed to have massive amounts of ironing. When I asked her one day why she had so much (and she loved ironing, starched everything so I called her Mrs Tiggy-Winkle), she told me that it was for her ‘elderly’ neighbours, most of whom were much younger than she.

There are so many stories to be told about my granny.  The irony isn’t lost on me that as a  young woman who took a huge risk in disobeying her mother by running off to London to pursue a totally ‘unsuitable’ career (as it was seen in those days), she went on to look after her mother for the rest of her life.

Afternoon tea on trays and all.

 

About Sherri Matthews

Sherri has been writing full time since 2011. Currently working on her memoir, 'Stranger in a White Dress', she has been published in a variety of national magazines, websites and three anthologies. Sherri raised her three, now adult children, in California for twenty years and today, lives in England’s West Country with her hubby, Aspie youngest, two cats, a grumpy bunny and a family of Chinese Button Quails. She keeps out of mischief blogging, gardening, walking by the sea and snapping endless photographs. Her garden robin muse vists regularly.
This entry was posted in Family Memoirs, Flash Fiction and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

87 Responses to True Calling: Flash Fiction at Carrot Ranch

  1. cardamone5 says:

    Lovely tribute, and pic.

    Like

  2. I love your stories, Sherri, and your Granny. What a delightful woman. She had verve! 😀

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  3. What a heart-warming story, Sherri! And I never cease to be amazed at how each generation, no matter what the current technology, always seems to follow in the footsteps of the last, often in some of the ways you’d least expect. Almost as if we pick the traits to emulate deliberately; must be in the genes :-).
    Brightest Blessings,
    Tally 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Tally, lovely to see you here, thank you so much for your lovely comment, which is indeed very insightful and very relevant. In that regard, I hope to be half the woman my wonderful Granny was! And may I wish you the brightest of blessings right back 😀

      Like

  4. Heyjude says:

    The women in your family have very interesting (and long) lives. And a good flash fiction Sherri!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Glad you enjoyed it, thank you Jude, but I would also add that there is a good bit of eccentricity too 😉
      I’m trying to catch up after running errands all day (so behind thanks to Wimbledon) and now blogging and watching Murray at the same time. Absolutely gutted about Rafa – who IS that bloke who beat him? And now Murray is two sets down…aaaaarrrrghhhh 😦

      Like

      • Heyjude says:

        My head has been all over the place today Sherri, since I read the news that a fellow blogger – Christine – died this morning. I don’t know whether you knew her, but she was a lovely lady.

        http://dadirridreaming.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/vale-christine/

        Life is so short. We have to live every day. My friend lost her partner in a similar way and it is such a shock. I didn’t know Christine, but my eyes are still welling up.

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        • Sherri says:

          Thanks for letting me know Jude. I just read Jo’s shocking post. I didnt know Christine but still, how terrible to have happened so suddenly like that, her poor husband and family and friends.
          Life is indeed short and every moment counts. Hugs to you Jude from me… ❤

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          • Heyjude says:

            It happened to my best friend. Her partner died suddenly from a cerebral haemorrhage. She was devastated and I was in Australia at the time so not around to support her. A dreadful time. Unexpected deaths are so shocking. It seems so unreal. This brought it all back as well as the death of my ex. Been feeling tearful all day. Thanks for the hugs Sherri, much appreciated.

            Like

      • Sherri says:

        That is awful Jude, and I can fully understand how Christine’s sudden death has impacted you so greatly as it brings back those horrible memories of what your best friend went through and so sorry too about your ex. It’s horrible too when you can’t be with your friends at times like that. It was the same for me when my best friend’s husband died, young, in California, and I couldn’t be with her, in person at least…so I do understand.
        My grandfather died suddenly at the age of 64 when I was 13 of a cerebral hemorrhage, I’ve never forgotten it (I adored him) nor the impact it had on my mum. It was all the more tragic considering how he left my grandmother and only lived another couple of years with his new wife. My granny, to her dying day, said he was the only man she had ever loved…
        I’m sending you even more hugs today Jude and hope you are feeling a little better, albeit shell-shocked as I know Jo is too and all who knew this lovely lady. So hard to comprehend. ❤

        Like

    • prior says:

      well I did not know the blogger – but my sympathies to you Jude – – Jo – and to all who did know here ❤ ❤

      Like

  5. She sounds like a wonderful person.

    So many stories to tell; so little time to write them all…

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  6. Your granny looks so sweet, Sherri. I love the photo of her and Aspie. My grandmother married a minister and also never learned to drive. Her husband left her when she was in her early 60’s, but he died of a heart attack, while preaching his sermon. Mamaw, as we called her, never remarried and lived on her own as well, until she died peacefully in her sleep a few months before her 80th birthday. Grannies are the greatest! xo

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…thank you Jill, she was a lovely, sweet and wonderful lady. I wanted to post some photos of her as a young woman (lovely sepia ones) but I didn’t have time to get them from my mum, so thought this photo would do just as well 😉
      Goodness, what an incredible story of your grandmother too Jill. The coincidences are amazing because my grandfather died only 2 years after he remarried very suddenly at the age of 64 (he had had a previous heart attack too). I’m so glad that your Mamaw’s life ended peacefully too. That is a great blessing. Grannies are indeed the best 🙂 xo

      Like

  7. What a wonderful and brave woman your Granny was, Sherri. I love the photo of her reading to Aspie D. A beautiful story and tribute to her. xx

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    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Sylvia, and yes, she was indeed wonderful and brave. She inspired me greatly. I’m glad you liked the photo, brings back many happy memories that… 🙂 xx

      Like

  8. This is a beautiful story, Sherri! Well written! A wonderful tribute to your Granny. I called my mom’s mom Granny also!! I never knew my dad’s mom. She died when my dad was 9. I always wondered if that had a lot to do with his problems later in life.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Patsy, I’m really glad you enjoyed it 🙂 So sad for your dad to lose his mother so young and that must have had a huge impact on his life and not in a good way. My dad lost his mother when he was in his 30’s (she was only 56) and his drinking escalated after that. I’m convinced that he never got over it and he was already a grown man by then…

      Like

      • You’re welcome, Sherri. Wow, was your dad close to his mom? I heard my dad’s mom was sick all the time while he was growing up, and he had two sisters and a brother, so I think they were taken care of by relatives a lot. I always thought that impacted him greatly. He sure didn’t go to much group therapy while he was in for treatment in 1987. Once they started talking about childhoods, he quit going to them, but he firmly decided he didn’t want to drink any more and he never did! He was afraid of losing my mom, because she told him if he didn’t quit, she was leaving, even though I doubt she really would have. 😉

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        • Sherri says:

          Yes Patsy, my dad was very close to his mum but he wasn’t over there all the time as we didn’t live that close by. Dad is the youngest of three and I think he and his mother had a special bond. That’s great that your dad stopped drinking like that, as I’ve said before. Sounds like he had a really tough childhood. Thanks so much for sharing your stories with me Patsy. I hope you have a good day my friend, it’ll be bed time here soon 🙂

          Like

  9. jenniferkmarsh says:

    This was lovely to read. What a marvellous woman 🙂 Thanks for sharing, Sherri

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Jenny Jen Jen, I’m really glad you enjoyed this little share about my Granny (so much more I could write and will do one way or another)! She was indeed a wonderful woman 🙂

      Like

  10. Lisa Reiter says:

    Fantastic feisty woman and a lovely bit of history. Thanks for sharing it xx

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Haha…yes, love that, ‘fantastic fiesty woman’. She was indeed, and never complained about anything. Thank you Lisa, so glad you enjoyed it 🙂 xx

      Like

  11. What a wonderful lady. You’ve brought her to life in your story, and the small bit of history you’ve told here. She’s someone I would love to have met!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much, I love that you say that Susan, that I ‘brought her to life’. I always hope to do that even when it is a short piece such as this one. I intend to write much more about my granny at some point, still formulating ideas, you know how that is!! She was indeed a wonderful lady and I’m sure she would have loved to have met you too…and served you tea in a china cup and a nice slice of her homemade oven cake while doing so 😉

      Like

  12. Denise says:

    What an amazing, absorbing story. You tell family histories soooo well.

    Like

  13. Charli Mills says:

    I love that through your true calling you can honor that of your Granny! The rest of the story rounds out the woman she became. Sounds like she found away to maintain her independent spirit despite setbacks and family duty. Wonderful flash and inspired post!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Charli, what a lovely thing to say and I’m really glad you enjoyed this flash! I had hoped to share a lovely sepia photo of Granny as a girl but I didn’t have time to get it from my mum! She really was an incredible lady who had many setbacks but never complained and lived a full life surrounded by the family who loved her and who she loved so much 🙂

      Like

  14. Amy says:

    Love this story of your grandma. Thank you for sharing, Sherri!

    Like

  15. You have a gift for flash fiction Sherri. So glad you found it, so we could find out about grandma. Yay!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Wow! That is a great compliment coming from you Renee and I thank you so much, for that and also so glad you enjoyed reading about my dear granny. Yay indeed 🙂

      Like

  16. Pingback: From Dirt to Words « Carrot Ranch Communications

  17. Oh, Sherri, my guess is that “Mrs Tiggy-Winkle” was as charmed and proud of you as you were of her. Wonderful and touching details.

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  18. Sunni Morris says:

    Sherri,

    This sounds a bit like my grandmother. (She even looks similar) She had fancy trays and teacups and saucers. She was quite feisty and still having slumber parties with her girlfriends into her 80’s. She lived to her mid-nineties also. She drove until an accident took that luxury away from her. She was always an inspiration to me.

    You have some nice memeories of your grandmother.

    Sunni

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Sunni, what lovely memories you have of your grandmother too, and yes, in many ways she does sound similar to mine. I’m really glad you enjoyed reading this little snippet, thank you very much 🙂

      Like

  19. Imelda says:

    What a beautiful life your grandmother had – hardships and pain and all. Because she was trained for caring, she became the best carer for everyone, not just her family. How kind she was to think about others and hold herself out in their service. 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…thank you so much Imelda for your kind, thoughtful words. She truly was a carer, in heart and spirit and she never complained even when life was tough and threw her more than one curve ball. She truly was inspirational 🙂

      Like

  20. jennypellett says:

    What a lady! Methinks you’ve inherited her spirit Sherri. I love the fact she rode a tricycle – nicely eccentric – good for her 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Haha…well, I thank you for that Jenny, as if I can be half the woman my dear granny was then I’ll settle for that…and you hit the nail on the head perfectly – she truly was ‘nicely eccentric’ and wonderful for it too 🙂

      Like

  21. bulldog says:

    What a lovely tribute to Gran… I have such wonderful memories of my Gran who lived till she was 99 a real Lady if there ever was one…

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh..that is wonderful Bulldog! 99 – wow! I used to say to my Granny that I wanted her to live to be 100 so that she could get her telegram from the Queen but she used to say she wasn’t bothered about that!!!

      Like

  22. Mabel Kwong says:

    What a spirited Granny you had. So full of energy and courage up until her later years. Some might have called her stubborn wanting to be a nurse…but the way I see it she was very, very determined. And sometimes, it pays off. I guess she followed her heart and had no regrets.

    Blogging and writing. Definitely an adventure. For me, I’ve learnt to share my thoughts of the world through blogging and it’s so nice meeting fellow bloggers along the way. Like you, Sherri. Thanks for sharing this heartwarming story with us 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Yes, she was indeed a spirited Granny! She certainly had a great determination when she knew what she wanted to do and I love that you put her stubbornness in that light 😉
      It really is wonderful isn’t it Mabel and thank you so much, I’m so glad you enjoyed reading this little story and I’m honoured to have met you through blogging and to be able to share in your thoughts and adventures 🙂

      Like

  23. Seyi sandra says:

    Such a lovely story my friend, and you tell it so well! I had a smile on my face while reading your lovely Gran’s story. Disobeying her parents and following her heart’s calling is such a spirited thing to do at that period. She lived a great life Sherri. 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much my friend, how lovely of you to share your heart in this way about my dear Granny! She certainly was a very spirited and courageous lady and I hope I can follow in her footsteps. Blessings to you Seyi 🙂

      Like

  24. Your grandmother sounds like such a spirited and kind woman. How lovely that you were able to know her so well.

    Like

  25. Steven says:

    Lovely story! What a marvellous woman, seeing through so many setbacks with such spirit and kindheartedness. Like someone else I know!

    Like

  26. prior says:

    wonderful woman –
    ❤ afternoon tea and all ❤

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Love that…thank you Y ❤ ❤ ❤

      Like

      • prior says:

        hey Sherri – well I am on the thread for this and so I read the comments coming in and my heart goes out to Jude (I will drop by there and leave a note) but also wanted to just say that as I read your warm words to Jo about the commenting – well I was again reminded of your hospitality – and it was so sweet how you cared about replies and chiming in – and you are right to value the convos that may happen – but your tenderness was so sweet.

        also – I was over hear linking one of your posts because I before I take my break I was trying to get a one year anniversary page going. It did not happen – rabbit trails kept coming, ya know. and there will be time later to finish it…
        and I will share more later – but I was reflecting on poetry (cause this one blogger’s poetry post was slamming certain styles of poetry) and well, as I was responding to her infantile logic (ha!) well I was referencing a few bloggers that used poetry so effectively and so unique and in a way that flowed from who they were – and your “room to breathe” post was the one that I plan on linking…. and again – that was such a nice way to share – with a smooth use of poetry…

        Like

      • Sherri says:

        Well that is so very kind of you Y, I appreciate you taking the time to let me know that about my responses, you are a very thoughtful, sweet lady.

        I am not one for reading a lot of poetry for the simple reason that I don’t understand it! I want to feel something when I read it and so when I write mine I let the words flow, often just from one word – it might even be the only word, often the first or last one – and then my emotions spill out (usually conflicting, out of a place of pain or grief or a sense of loss, past or present, and a sense of injustice and anger and betrayal but with some kind of resolution even though it might not be the kind wanted) and let the words write themselves. If even one person reads them and is moved to reply or is stirred up in some way then I am truly amazed because I understand how subjective poetry is.
        Poems are a deeper, darker way of expression and so we share a raw and vulnerable part of our souls, exposed to those who read them. If the style isn’t what the reader wants then they have the choice – not to read them!
        So, all that to say, I am truly humbled that you would take the time to let me know your thoughts about my poetry Yvette – really means so much that, mon amie!
        I hope you are having a great weekend and had a super July 4th. I’ll see you soon 😀 ❤

        Like

  27. What a wonderful story. Your granny sounds like a fantastic woman who was independent and didn’t let the world hold her down at all. Remember you’ve inherited some of that and allow this fact to bring you joy. Peace to you Sherri! 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      She was a really fantastic woman Lilka, my inspiration. She had a quiet faith and never complained about anything. Thank you so much, that means a lot to think that I might have inherited even a fraction of her spirit. Peace and blessings to you too my friend 🙂

      Like

  28. restlessjo says:

    Hi Sherri 🙂 I’ve completely lost the thread of what I was going to say because I saw Jude’s comments and went over to hers to say a few words. She seemed so upset and I didn’t see a way to comment on here. (some of the blogs let you ‘chip in’ with the conversation- mine does, and I can never decide if it’s a good thing or a bad thing)
    Taking deep breaths and spreading smiles today. Or trying to 🙂 It’s what Christine would have wanted, I know. Would you believe I’ve booked Tavira when the US Open is on? How have I managed that??? I’ll have to move into that hotel if he’s successful (though I’ll be back for the final). Murray was a spud, but he was never going to do it again this year, was he? Not sure who to shout for now but I like Bouchard in the ladies.

    Grandma- that’s what we were talking about. Well- you were! Amazing the stories the oldies can tell us. Everyone has a story if you delve a bit. Some people you just can’t shut up. Know who I mean? 🙂 🙂 Hugs, Sherri.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Jo. I just commented over on Jude’s blog in response to your mention of not being able to chip in on my blog. As I said over there, bloggers chip in all the time over here so I was concerned that you were having trouble doing so over here and now I read your comment here so I can see what you mean! Maybe when other bloggers chip in they go to the original ‘reply’ at the beginning of the thread to do so. I was worried that you were having a problem not being able to comment (I’ve had a couple of people tell me that recently and I was beginning to get a bit paranoid that there was a problem with my blog!). I’ll take a look at my settings and see if I can change things a bit to make it more obvious for others to chip in as I do like it when they do. Anything to foster a conversation 😉 But try that next time, just go to the original ‘reply’ slot and you should be okay…hopefully 🙂
      Right, with that out of the way, phew…
      Ahh…well, with the way the tennis is going, perhaps Tavira is the best place to be, haha! Yes, Murray was awful, he looked like he couldn’t wait to get out of there and all those balls into the net? I don’t know who to root for now either. Hubby and Aspie D are Federer fans (although she was sad too about Rafa) so maybe I’ll join them!! Although I do like that Canadian who beat that upstart who beat Rafa, can’t remember his name. The guy who beat Murray seemed good too. My heart isn’t in it though. Bouchard is good, maybe it’s her turn this year…
      Now, yes, onto Granny!! And were you referring to me about not knowing when to shut up Jo? Hahahahahhaha…well, more rabbit than Sainsburys that’s for sure. But if you were alluding to the length of your comment, well, we make a great pair, that’s all I can say!! 😉
      And on a serious note Jo, I really am again so very sorry about your friend Christine. I’m glad you are spreading the joy that her life gave (as you know, I didn’t know her, but she sounds like a really wonderful woman) and you are carrying on her blogging light. But I know you must still be reeling from the huge shock of all this, with the terrible suddenness of it all…
      Well, it’s been great chatting to you and now I need to get my post ready for later..so behind already, ha!!! Big hugs right back to you Jo … 🙂 ❤

      Like

    • Heyjude says:

      Just me, chipping in – my goodness you two can certainly rabbit on 😀
      Wimbledon definitely gone flat now – as you both said “What WAS wrong with Murray?”
      He played dreadfully – bring back Lendl is all I can say – Murray should have been more proactive in the game, there didn’t seem to be any fire in his belly at all. But I don’t like Federer’s game, it always seems so boring. So who to root for? Bouchard – maybe, but I hate it when the commentators gush over her looks – or Kvitova. The women’s matches have been so much better this year. Oh well, maybe I’ll get my posts written now!
      Jude xx

      Like

      • Sherri says:

        Hi Jude! Haha…yes, a lot of rabbiting going on over here today! I’ve just barely managed to get my post out for Lisa’s bite size memoir and my mum has arrived for the afternoon, so I’ll have to get back here later, but did just want to reply that yes, I agree with everything you say here. Do you think maybe we could ask Rafa to come back? We need some excitement…!!! Murray had nothing to give did he? He must be pretty ticked off with himself, I know I would be. At least Rafa put up a fight. I’m not a Federer fan so you know how desperate I am when I say he’s all there is!!!! Well, let’s see what the women come up with today, maybe some action. Happy post-writing and see you soon for our next Wimbledon update 🙂 xx

        Like

      • restlessjo says:

        I realised what a clutz I was after the event, Sherri/Jude 🙂 Of course I can chip in!
        I’d like Dimitrov or Raonic to win but I could care less.

        Like

    • Sherri says:

      No probs Jo…there are so many things here on WP that I haven’t got a clue about. Sheer trial and error and mostly error, haha! Well, what with Wimbledon now? Not inspired in the slightest. Where’s Rafa when we need him…. 😉

      Like

  29. Go Madeline Dorothy! What a wonderful woman with an interesting life – is she going to feature in the memoir Sherri? Or does she get a story of her own perhaps? Have you seen these free online workshops: https://www.mslexia.co.uk/magazine/workshops/workshops.php – I think they may be too basic for you, but there is going to be a third one which might have some use.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…thanks so much Andrea! She won’t be in my memoir (only a very brief mention) but I do find it very interesting you ask this because I have been thinking for a long time about writing about her in a separate book. Stories/recipes, that kind of thing? Many thanks too for the link, I will definitely take a look at it. I’ve actually submitted a few of my poems to Mslexia for their competition, but whether I get anywhere, well, let’s see! I’ll keep you posted and hope that you have some good news soon! 🙂

      Like

  30. Sherri, can I tell you how much I love your writing? Every word choice is perfectly suited for that sentence. What a wonderful Granny you had! I enjoyed the story very much. 🙂

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Oh Maria, you have just made my day (and night!) seriously! Thank you so much for what you say here, this really encourages me so, so much, I can’t even tell you. Wow. I’m so happy to know this! Coming from you too, because I love your writing, what a fantastic compliment.
      And yes, my Granny was wonderful…I will have to share a few more stories about her! If I don’t get over to you before, I want to wish you a very Happy July 4th, hope you have a great one 😀 😎

      Like

  31. thirdhandart says:

    A wonderful story Sherri… very well-written! A few Baptist Ministers show up in my family history too. And, I agree… grandmothers are the best 😉

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      How fascinating to know we share some Baptist Ministers in our families! I’m so glad you enjoyed this read about my granny, thank you as always Theresa. I agree, grandmothers really are the best, aren’t they? 🙂

      Like

  32. This is so sweet, Sherri. I haven’t known my grandmothers much since they passed away too soon. But I do have a few lovely memories and they are very precious to me. I like the fact that your Granny rode a tricycle and ironed for her neighbors. I do apologize for being late in catching up with your posts. I am on a road trip so I can only check email when I am at the hotel, often late at night. But I still love your posts very much. Enjoy the summer!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you very much Evelyne and how sweet of you to take the time to read my blog and leave all your lovely messages during your road trip. How kind of you.
      I hope you and your hubby are having a lovely time 🙂
      I’m so glad that you have a few precious memories of your dear grandmothers, held closely in your heart. I was very blessed to have had my granny until my mid 40s and I miss her to this day.
      We are enjoying some lovely, summery weather, thank you, and I would say to you the very same…enjoy your summer too, have a great time away and see you soon 😀 😎 😉

      Like

  33. Sherri what a lovely post. I love your Granny already and would love to hear more stories. She sounds like a real character and a caring lady. When you read my bite size you will know that I am in awe that she rode a tricycle for so long and her accident confirms that I did the right thing.
    Cheers Irene XD

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Oh Irene, you would have loved my Granny and she would have loved you too, I just know it!! Isn’t it amazing that she lived in Australia for 7 years? I inherited the silver tea set with the tray in the shape of Australia when her father retired from the ministry there. Just looked at the engraving, says February 5th 1914, Collins Street Baptist Church, Melbourne. He wrote a book too called Seven Years Under The Southern Cross! I’m heading over to your post after this, I’m intrigued, can’t wait…needless to say I haven’t even done my flash for Charli…but I figure I’ve got a while due to the time difference, phew! Got busy with the guest post, which thanks so much for reading. I wasn’t sure how it would go down, but then that’s what writing’s all about isn’t it? Taking those risks… 😉

      Like

  34. Arun says:

    i love it….incredible post…..good..

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you very much Arun, I appreciate you visiting and taking the time to read this story of my dear grandmother and also for your lovely comment, very kind of you – Sherri 🙂

      Like

  35. Pat says:

    Thank you for sharing, Sherri. I enjoyed this story about your Granny. I love her free spirit and tenacity in following her dreams and how she shared her love giving to others.

    I was close to my grandmother, too, and loved her very much. I remember how real and comfortable she was in her own skin. She was true to herself. They seem similar that way.

    Like

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