Compassion: 99 Word Flash Fiction

Gather your eggs and flour, load up on lemons and sprinkle the sugar, for today is Pancake Day!

I missed celebrating Pancake Day when living in California. Even though I made my English pancakes (thinner and larger than American pancakes, more like crepes) for my children now and then, I wasn’t able to give them the same sense of excitement and anticipation of this special ‘feast’ that I had growing up.

Although Pancake Day isn't celebrated in America, AspieD enjoyed helping with other baking - 1990s (c) Sherri Matthews

Although Pancake Day isn’t celebrated in America, Aspie D enjoyed helping bake – 1990s
(c) Sherri Matthews

The fun of eating pancakes was matched only by the thrill of watching my mother make them: first, she poured some batter into a frying pan.  Then, after a few minutes, my brother and I geared up for the moment, hardly daring to breathe, as she tossed the pancake up  into the air while flipping the pan, catching it as it flopped back down perfectly into the frying pan – without ending up  as a sloppy, white mess on the kitchen floor or stuck on the ceiling.  Which has happened to me more than once.

This was the magic trick you see, the true success of the perfect pancake, and it’s success was marked by smothering it in lashings of lemon juice and sugar and then devouring it. And immediately asking for another one.

But why do we do it?

Well, Pancake Day is otherwise called ‘Shrove Tuesday’, which comes from the word ‘shrive’, which means ‘confess’.  This day always falls on the Tuesday preceding Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent.

Before the fasting season of 40 days of Lent began, pancakes were made as a great way to use up all the ‘rich’ foods such as butter, sugar and eggs. Even earlier than Christian times, pancakes were eaten during pagan festivals,  thought to symbolise the sun, imparting the sun’s power, warmth and light when eaten.

That explains why they taste so good.

And what does all this have to do with this post’s title? Well, thinking beyond the fun of Pancake Day since it brings us to the cusp of one of the most important times of reflection in the Christian calendar, it seems to me that Charli has set us the perfect prompt for her Flash Fiction challenge this week, asking:

‘February 11, 2015 prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story that demonstrates compassion. You can explore weltschmerz (enabling us to care enough about what’s wrong) and meliorism (driving us to try to do something about it) if you want to explore those specific terms.’

She also told us of #1000Speak for Compassion, a blogging event taking place this Friday, 20th February, details in the link.

So then, whatever our beliefs and whether or not we’ll be flipping pancakes this evening, I remain convinced that in every dark corner, no matter the depth of the malevolence lurking there, there is someone stirred up enough to not only care, but also to do the right thing.  To have a little compassion.

This is my flash, 99 words, no more, no less:

True Grit

The old man went down at the first push. “Not so tough now, are yer?” spat Vin as he aimed a heavy kick into the man’s ribs.

The others laughed and jeered, their voices echoing in the dimly lit alley. Vin threw his arm around Joe’s neck as they walked back to the pub.

“I warned that old git before not to ask for money. He had it coming.”

“Yeah, good on yer mate,” Joe lied, pulling away. “Look, I need a slash, you go on…”

Joe slipped behind a charity shop, then ran back to the old man.

About Sherri Matthews

Sherri has been writing full time since 2011. Currently working on her memoir, 'Stranger in a White Dress', she has been published in a variety of national magazines, websites and three anthologies. Sherri raised her three, now adult children, in California for twenty years and today, lives in England’s West Country with her hubby, Aspie youngest, two cats, a grumpy bunny and a family of Chinese Button Quails. She keeps out of mischief blogging, gardening, walking by the sea and snapping endless photographs. Her garden robin muse vists regularly.
This entry was posted in Family Traditions, Flash Fiction, My California and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

87 Responses to Compassion: 99 Word Flash Fiction

  1. Ugh. Awesome except that he went back after instead of stopping his friend. Why do people do this? Fear? “Loyalty”? Just glad he did the “right thing” eventually and returned.

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  2. Pat says:

    First, I’ve never heard of Pancake’s Day, Sherri, though I can see why you’d enjoy them so. Can’t say I share your love for pancakes, though, I’m coming from a different perspective. I rarely eat them today mainly because it was our main staple growing up when there weren’t many groceries in the house. I guess you could say I’ve had my fill of pancakes to last a lifetime. haha

    Compassion, on the other hand, is another story and one you so distinctly expressed. I think it strange how we can seemingly participate in anger and hate, while secretly go about following the heart and making things right. I wonder when we’ll stop being fearful of our true feelings and values and let our actions truly show what’s in our hearts with kindness and love.-

    Happy Tuesday 🙂

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    • Sherri says:

      Goodness Pat, you have certainly had your ‘fill of pancakes, I can understand that! I don’t think I’ll ever get tired of them, but we only had them once a year for Pancake Day so they were always a novelty 🙂 As for compassion, yes, I’ll be sharing more of my thoughts in my Friday post exploring this further. I am deeply saddened by the way so much anger and hatred snakes its way through society but you make a very valid point – how much of that which is shown is actually what is truly felt? It comes down to courage when all is said and done. Those we look up to today were men and women with that courage, who stood up for the truth and did what was right no matter the consequences for themselves. If only we can follow their example. Thank you Pat for your insightful and thought-provoking comment, and Happy Tuesday to you too 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Pat says:

        Ah, having pancakes once a year. I can see where they would then be enjoyed and celebrated as a novelty and you’d love them so much. It has to be spells in between before I’d eat a pancake and then it would be when the grand kids are full and there’s only one left.

        On compassion, I’m looking forward to reading more on your thoughts and reflections. I think what we believe and how we feel are as complex and individual as much as we are. It’s not so much as to what is right or wrong but what we’ve experienced and how we live from that in our every day lives in our world. It will be a good topic, for sure, and no doubt a good discussion with feedback from your readers.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          In the end Pat, I asked myself the same questions…when did I turn a blind eye and do nothing, leaving it to the next person? Too many times I’m afraid. Empathy and compassion…feeling it but then doing something about it. That is the difference isn’t it? Oh Pat, we could chat all day couldn’t we around your old kitchen table? All I know is that you have a beautiful, caring and kind heart and I’m so glad I met you and I’m thrilled that you share your excellent thoughts, ideas and reflections both here with your readers and also with mine. And so it goes…have a wonderful weekend my friend, sending big hugs across the shining sea to you … 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          • Pat says:

            Yes, so many questions, Sherri. I guess on any given situation we don’t know how we are supposed to respond. In the end, maybe we should trust that however we respond is what was needed in the moment. If we didn’t do anything, it’s possible the moment was for someone else to do something. More and more we could talk about, for sure. It’s interesting and I’ve always loved the exchange. Take care and hugs. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

            • Sherri says:

              Very interesting your thoughts Pat. I am a great believer that we are so often put in that position of being able to give what was needed at that particular time, even if different for someone else. Thank you…you take care too and lots of hugs right back 🙂

              Liked by 1 person

  3. Such a cute pic of Aspie and the batter bowl. 🙂 I have the same fond memories of Pancake Day, as you do. Our mum never missed making pancakes, and we also ate them with lemon juice and sugar. My mouth is watering, just remembering it. I enjoyed your Flash Fiction piece. I hope Joe was able to help the old man, and also gave him a bob or two. 🙂 xx

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh, thank you Sylvia, I love this photo of Aspie D 🙂 And yes, you know of what I speak! Pancake Day was such a great day of excitement wasn’t it? I’m glad you have those happy memories too 🙂 And I’m also so glad you enjoyed the flash…don’t worry, Joe looked after the old man 😉 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Shrove or shrive, Sherri, you didn’t need to “confess” about pancakes, but I’m glad you did! This is delightful, and I’m still smiling, charmed by your daughter’s adorable childhood picture.
    We didn’t have Pancake Day while I was growing up, but we did have Fried Mush Dinner night with bacon and eggs at least once at the end of the month. It was a cheap meal, and especially in winter it was a filling and warm meal, and sometimes we played like settlers caught in a storm on the plains and lit an assortment of candles on the table and pretended to hear hungry animals outside, wanting our mush. 🙂
    Those tight end-of-month meals were actually the richest in fun and creative story telling. And now the story telling continues with your flash fiction!

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    • Sherri says:

      Haha…well, nothing like a true confession Marylin 🙂 So glad to share this British celebration with you, something special I grew up with! But I’ve never heard of Fried Mush Dinner night but what great fun! This fires up my imagination in the most wonderful way. The way you describe it is so evocative and brings back many memories for me of being indoors on wild, wintery nights with the wind howling outside and nothing but candles and an open fire for light and heat. We too used to imagine that wild animals lurked outside but we knew we were safe and sound indoors! Now, I have to ask. One of my daughter’s favourite books was Goodnight Moon and the story spoke of a ‘bowl full of mush’. We never knew what it was. Is this the same thing Marylin? I would love to know… 🙂

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      • Oh, I love GOODNIGHT MOON, but the bowl full of mush in the book was closer to cream of wheat, or something oatmeal-ly. My mom made mush out of cornmeal, water, salt and eggs, then put it in a bread pan and kept it in the refrigerator all day to set up. That evening she cut the mush into rectangle pieces and pan-fried them with the bacon until the mush was crisp on both sides. Now fancy restaurants call it “polenta” and serve with sour cream, chopped leeks and tomatoes. From plain to fancy; I liked my mom’s better. 😉

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      • Sherri says:

        Ahh…so now I know, this is fascinating Marylin, thanks so much for clearing this up for me. I always thought the mush in Goodnight Moon was some kind of oatmeal, or porridge as we call it here. But your mush sounds absolutely delicious. Who knew that your dear mom was the inventor of ‘polenta’? She should have patented it 🙂 I agree…hers sounds much better and how delicious served that way with lovely fried bacon, yummy! No wonder those creatures of your imagination wanted a piece! And thanks too for reminding me of ‘cream of wheat’ and ‘cornmeal’, both quintessentially American foods that I had no idea existed until I lived in CA 😉

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  5. Heyjude says:

    Your pancake tale brought back good memories of me in the kitchen with my four queuing up for their pancakes, by the time I’d got to the fourth child #1 was back again! I do agree that lemon juice and sugar are just the best! Though we also sprinkled cinnamon on sometimes or used golden syrup instead of syrup 🙂

    Good writing as usual, though I can’t say I liked the subject much – why can’t people be more tolerant of each other!

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    • Sherri says:

      Haha…yes, that sounds about right! No sooner is the first round finished, it’s time for the second! Glad to bring back good memories for you Jude 🙂 Ahh…yes, a tough one. I don’t seem capable of writing flash fiction that isn’t dark. It is reflective of what is on my mind, bringing it into the theme. I just can’t stand the way people are so full of hate. Writing it out like this helps control a better outcome I suppose.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Heyjude says:

    …sugar!! Instead of sugar! (Oh how I wish we could edit our own comments on here)

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  7. Aww…little Aspie looks so sweet in that photo, Sherri. Her little arms can barely reach around that big bowl. I’ve never heard of putting lemon and sugar on pancakes. Since I don’t like syrup, I always put peanut on my pancakes, when I was a kid. A treat we prepared on special occasions was chocolate chip pancakes…yum!
    Good for Joe! I like to read a happy ending. Nice job, Sherri.

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…such sweet memories of those days Jill 🙂 She used to love ‘helping’ me bake, and I had as much fun playing with her Easy Bake Oven! Yes, I remember you saying about maple syrup…I love it!! But you sound just like Nicky with the chocolate chip pancakes. He used to come back from a sleep over with one of his friends and tell me about his mom who made them together with Polish sausage! Thanks Jill, glad you liked the flash and the ending, even if it was a bit rough. Joe has a good heart 🙂 xo

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  8. TanGental says:

    My memory is of the dog waiting patiently by mum’s side knowing t least one pancake would not make it back into the pan. Great FF. Wonder if ‘slash’ translates across the pond?

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  9. What an adorable picture of Aspie D! Pancakes are always a real treat for me because we never made them that often growing up. Funnily enough, just this past weekend Matt asked me to make some pancakes for breakfast sometime soon!

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    • Sherri says:

      Thanks so much Heather, I do love that photo of her! Yes, same for me too, we only ever had them on Pancake Day too! I bet your pancakes for Matt were just heavenly…maybe he knew that Pancake Day was coming up 😉 Oh, and I made your Valentine’s treats, will be over shortly with my pic 🙂 )

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  10. O,h gosh. We observe Strove Tuesday, but I haven’t eaten pancakes in years. Don’t know why, just haven’t.
    Intriguing story, Sherri. I feel Joe couldn’t stop the beating because he was outnumbered, but he went back as soon as he could. Wouldn’t help anyone if the ‘guys’ turned on him as well. ❤ ❤

    Maybe silly question: What is a slash?

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh yes, in Canada it would be the same thing. I lost track when I lived in CA as it isn’t observed there so got really excited when I moved back here and started getting into the swing of things again…and I don’t just mean with the frying pan, haha 😀
      Thanks so much Tess for your great feedback on the FF…and guess what, you nailed it, so I’m delighted 🙂 ❤ Not a silly question at all, my fault. I used a Brit word there for these ruffians, but I suppose the word 'piss' would have been better, hoped it would translate but should have explained for those who don't know the slang. Hope it didn't ruin the story… 😦

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  11. Charli Mills says:

    Love that cute photo and love pancakes! My daughter learned to make crepes in French class and we had those on special occasions, with fresh strawberries and whipped cream! On weekends I make the Hub buttermilk pancakes and we do sprinkle powdered sugar on top, but I’ve not tried the squeeze of lemon! When you make pancakes as described, we call them “flapjacks.” I prefer a spatula. 🙂 Happy Shrove Day! And thank you for the cultural share.

    True Grit captures the complexity of male relationships and posturing. Violence often leads the way as a show of power. The friend probably wants no part of the violence but if he interferes it might be directed at him. It does show true grit to go against any powerful societal norm, even if it is afterwards. Great flash!

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    • Sherri says:

      Yes, I remember our shared love of pancakes Charli! Bring ’em on I say 🙂 Oh I love powdered sugar on top like that, and loved being able to get ‘German Pancakes’ at IHOP which were the closest I could get to our pancakes, served with powdered sugar and lemon juice…yummy! As for buttermilk pancakes, well, you know of my obsession for them, and in fact, I can’t wait to eat them over at your place for breakfast 🙂 And you’ve just taught me something, you know I never knew that’s what flapjacks were! They are kind of biscuity, chewy things here! I always thought it was another name for regular pancakes! So I should thank you for the cultural share. Geez, you would think I would have known that for as long as I lived in the States!!! And yes, I tend to agree…last night I used a spatula, I’m not the queen of pancake tossing like my mum 🙂
      You hit it in one Charli, thanks so much for that about the flash, that is just what I had in mind. Joe hated what his friend was doing but was afraid of the consequences if he tried to stop him. The only thing as Geoff pointed out is my use of the word ‘slash’, a Brit slang word for, the closest, would be ‘piss’ but more likely to be used by young lads here. I’m pretty sure it’s not used in the States…?…but hoped it would translate…

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  12. Mabel Kwong says:

    Such a beautiful, uplifting photo of Aspie D. She looks so happy making pancakes in the kitchen. It must be one of the moments that stick out to you when she was younger. I didn’t know there was a difference between American and English pancakes, always thought they were the same. It could also be because I never grew up with pancakes. Mum never made them or brought home any. Never had crepes either. It was only a few years ago that I started eating pancakes on occasion. They really are very lovely and I love them with Nutella 🙂 That was a great flash at the end. Very well written, Sherri. I really felt like the action was playing in front of my eyes…and that was a very nice and subtle way to end the short story. Hope you’re well, Sherri 🙂 ❤

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh, thank you so much Mabel, it is a sweet photo isn’t it? Oh such sweet memories… *sigh* 🙂 I’m glad that you now have the enjoyment of eating pancakes now and then…and with Nutella? Hmmm…never thought of that, but sounds very good! Something my husband would like, he adores Nutella 🙂 And I’m so glad you enjoyed the flash, you’ve made my day! Again, I know it is dark (but you know me!!) but always, in the darkest of places, there is light just waiting to be revealed, even if not always at the right time. Such is our human condition. Always such a pleasure to see you over at the Summerhouse dear Mabel, and I really must get out more and come and visit you too, which I promise to do. I am well thank you for asking, and hope you are too. Have a lovely Wednesday 🙂 ❤ 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Pingback: Stories of Compassion « Carrot Ranch Communications

  14. Hola, my lovely Sherri! First of all, what an adorable picture of your daughter. Such a sweet and happy face as she stirs the batter. Can I tell you that just two days ago, one of my cousins came to visit me here at my mom’s place in Puerto Rico. Her and her husband lived in London for many years prior to moving back to PR, and she kept taking about making pancakes on Tuesday. I didn’t get what she was talking about and she didn’t explain it as eloquently as you did. Now I understand. What a wonderful and delicious tradition.

    I so enjoyed True Grit as well.

    Hope you don’t wake tomorrow to batter on the ceiling. 🙂

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    • Sherri says:

      Hola back to you mi amiga (I barely know any Spanish, so am learning just for you!) 🙂 How lovely of you to pop over to the Summerhouse when you are away on your hols…and I will be over to catch up on your latest! Ahh….yes, I do adore this photo of my baby girl, oh such sweet memories… 🙂
      Wow, what an amazing coincidence with the pancakes and your cousin! I wish I could have come over and made some for you all! As for the ceiling,I admit to playing it safe – I’m not the pancake-tossing queen that my mum is, so I used a spatula, cissy that I am 😛 And so glad you enjoyed the flash, thanks so much Maria! Hope you are having a super time, but then I know you are. Soak it up for all it’s worth and see you soon 🙂 ❤

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  15. I also have not heard of pancake day but my mother often made the kind of pancakes you make. Thin and large to wrap around apple pie filling and drizzled with syrup. They were a treat for those nights our dad was on maneuvers so we had cheap, simple meals when he was gone. They were always served for dinner. We had no idea there was little money for food. just delighted to have the sweet meal. I made them for awhile. Not so much anymore.

    As for your story. I liked how you turned it. For every narcissist, there are 10 kind and caring people. Some just to afraid to stand against the powerful one.

    Your daughter has a sweet face, I’ll bet even still. What a wonderful memory.

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    • Sherri says:

      Oooh…your mother’s pancakes sound divine Marlene! I love how you only remember how delicious your evening meals were, ‘delighting’ in them, not even having to worry about the lack of money because your dear mother made your meals so special without so much of a hint of any troubles. I would be blessed if I thought my children spoke about me this way. A beautiful testimony to a beautiful family life, thank you for sharing that.
      I’m so glad you liked the flash too…I wanted to show the turn around even if it couldn’t be as a preventative. But such is life and the power of peer pressure and all too prevelant these days it seems. But then not much has changed I suppose…
      And thank you so much, my daughter blesses me every day with her sweet face…but such precious memories… *sigh* and *smile* 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Well, that was fun, Sherri – both the pancake backstory AND the 99-word story! If you observe Lent, I hope it is a blessed season for you.

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  17. That was a great story Sherri. Compassion is surely lacking it seems in our world today.
    On a lighter note, had I known about pancake day I would have “celebrated” with a stack. 🙂

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  18. yprior1 says:

    lemon on pancakes sounds so good. 🙂 and I prefer a crepe to the thick fluffy ones – and the photo of your d. – awe – great how she is turned around and just smiling like that.
    also enjoyed your short story –

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  19. jennypellett says:

    Well, my name is mud today because I didn’t realise we had got to Shrove Tuesday so there were no pancakes in our house last night. It’ll take something for me to redeem myself.
    I liked your Flash – you do ‘dark’ very well!

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    • Sherri says:

      Well, I have a heads-up Jenny as it’s always very close to my mum’s birthday, so that’s how I remember! Don’t feel bad…you can make them another night and hopefully nobody will notice..shhhhhh….. And thanks so much for the flash, you’ve made my day 🙂

      Like

  20. Jhanis says:

    Well I hope Joe helped the old man! 🙂
    Your little girl looked so adorable in the photo Sherri!

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  21. TBM says:

    I hadn’t heard of pancake day until I moved here. And now I know the reason. The bad news, I forgot it was yesterday. I’m always late.

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    • Sherri says:

      That is the great thing about living in another country isn’t it, learning all about the different traditions and observances. But don’t worry TB, it’s never too late for pancakes 🙂

      Like

  22. It’s Pancake Wednesday here in Hove today, Sherri, as we missed the pancakes yesterday due to being too full after dinner. However, it’s a light dinner this evening followed by pancakes containing currents for me. I like them that way as that is what my mother always added to them when she made them. We had the plain ones with lemon juice and sugar as well, but having them with currents was a real treat.

    I also remember the pancake race we had at school every Shove Tuesday when all the mothers (and some of the fathers) would run down a field while flipping a pancake in a frying pan. You don’t see or hear of that happening anymore, but your post brought back happy memories of that ‘once a year’ race for me.

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    • Sherri says:

      Haha…well, any day is a good day for pancakes as far as I’m conccerned Hugh 🙂 Mmmm….currants are so good, I love them in Scotch pancakes too, with lots of butter…naughty, I know! And yes, I remember those pancake races too. I wonder what did happen to them? For some strange reason, I have a memory of watching Princess Diana taking part in one in the 90s at William’s school I think (on the news, not in person!). She won I believe! Funny the things we remember isn’t it? And of course, so much has happened since then…so, so much…
      Thanks for your great comment Hugh…and since it is now Thursday, I will say I hope you had a very Happy Pancake Wednesday 🙂

      Like

      • We did indeed, Sherri, and in fact we had Pancake Sunday yesterday as our local Waitrose still had them on sale.

        I’m guessing that is it now for another year, but at least we have Easter Eggs to come and hot buttered Hot Cross Buns are a real favourite of mine, even though we can buy them all year long now. Back when I was a child, you only saw Hot Cross Buns at Easter although they did briefly become Winer Spice Buns during Christmas just gone.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          Oh yes, I remember when Hot Cross Buns were for Easter only. Shame really they are so available, it takes some of the magic away doesn’t it? Still…they are delicious 😉

          Like

  23. Amy says:

    Thank you for sharing your beautiful memories. I love this precious photo. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I love the fact that pancakes once represented the sun’s warmth and light. They do taste glorious, especially dabbed with butter and covered in syrup.

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  25. Rachel M says:

    I love the story, Sherri. I just wish a Joe had had the guts to stand up to his mate.

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  26. Annecdotist says:

    Loved your Flash, Sherry. Young people rely so much on fitting in with their mates, I can see how it was hard for Joe to speak out. Good that you gave him the chance to make amends.

    Like

  27. First what a darling photo of your little girl!! 🙂 ❤ Wheres does the time fly to? And again I learned something new, Pancake Day and it's meaning. Such a wonderful custom to enjoy and to read about here on your blog. And what a great story on compassion and as always you leave me longing for more! Each week I look forward to reading your blog and not just being entertained but enriched by it! xoxo

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…yes, what precious memories come with this photo my friend 🙂 ❤ We had so many happy family times in that house…
      And I'm so glad to share Pancake Day with you…I never really knew it's proper meaning growing up, just a good excuse to have this wonderful treat which we only ever had on the day. No wonder I'm so crazy for American pancakes too!
      Thank you so much for all you say about your visits here…and I'm really glad you enjoyed the flash. Love your visits 🙂 ❤ xoxo

      Like

  28. Mahesh Nair says:

    It’s lovely to know about Pancake Day. Sorry, didn’t know that before. Have eaten pancakes though, mostly at Courtyard Marriott hotels 🙂 They keep a pancake machine.

    Then the day’s connection with Ash Wednesday and Lent. Didn’t know that either. And how to “confess” and eat those rich foods before fasting begins. So much knowledge and culture there.

    Loved your Flash on Compassion. Your response to the prompt is as it should have been. There are people like Joe who remain sandwiched between insensitivity and sensitivity. They take care of both for sake of friendship and humanity. When you write a sequel to this, we’d perhaps want to see Joe come of age and prefer humanity to friendship. Because if Vin is Joe’s true friend he’ll also come of age.

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    • Sherri says:

      A pancake machine? Sounds great 🙂 I’m thrilled to share this with you Mahesh, I didn’t know too much about it myself growing up, Pancake Day was more just a day for a wonderful treat, since we only got them on that one day, more or less!
      Thank you so much again for your wonderful feedback on the flash. I love how you urge me to write a sequel…and yes, if I did, that is just how it would be. In fact, if the word allowance had been greater, I would have explored this very aspect, Joe’s struggle with wanting to stand up to his friend and not wanting to be a part of this going along with the crowd stuff any longer. And yes, giving Vin great cause to think about the wasteland that his life has become and that he needs to change. Fast 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  29. simplyilka says:

    Yummy!!! Sherri, you really managed to make ‘a pancake’ a happy event 🙂

    Like

  30. I used to love pancake day. We always used to sing that little ditty For today is Sunday then tomorrow’s Monday Tuesday day is pancake day lets dance our cares away. Hopsa Lisela Hopsa Marion Dance your cares away. Pancake day however seems to have disappeared from the Australian calendar – sad. You’ve made my mouth water with the lemon and sugar.
    Your flash is good but like Sarah I wondered why he would have allowed it to happen. Mind you Vince might have been the type of tough guy that no-one messes with and this way at least he was able to run back to help rather than lying alongside with two broken legs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Love this, thanks Irene! I’ve never heard that song though! Sad that Pancake Day isn’t over in Oz anymore…you’ll have to come over here from now on if you want some of those lovely pancakes with loads of lemon and sugar 😀
      As for Joe, he wanted to stand up to Vin but was afraid to. He couldn’t live with himself though and had to do something…and I like to think that next time he stood up to Vin, broken legs or not… o_O

      Like

      • Here is the tune to go with the words you’ll just have to sing a long. It seems as though very few people have ever heard of this song although I thought it was common throughout the world on Pancake Day.

        Good luck for Joe broken legs hurt.

        Like

      • Sherri says:

        Oh Irene, thanks for this, what a cute song! It’s stuck now so next year, I’ll be singing it along with you on Pancake Day 😀
        And I think Joe will need all the help he can get… 😉

        Like

  31. Sherri I always enjoy your flash fiction, you really do have such a talent to draw your reader in.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. For the first time ever, I managed to toss my pancakes!
    That story of the old man — conscience has to start somewhere and can grow with practice. Maybe this is a turning point in Joe’s life, even if it means him having to take the can for the old man’s injuries, or testify against his mates.

    Liked by 1 person

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