Flash Fiction: No Way Out Part Four: The Grave

It’s Tuesday, flash fiction time over at Carrot Ranch, which means more of Bill here at the Summerhouse.   But before I go, can I just say a huge thank you to those of you who have shown such an interest in this ongoing story.  This is all so new to me but I’m really enjoying the challenge and hope you will too.

But first, I would like to show you around a churchyard in the beautiful small market town of Sherborne, Dorset.

Charli’s flash fiction prompt this week is to write a creepy story in 99 words that has some connection to a cemetery.  Since I’m still writing Bill’s story, my flash will be ‘creepy’ but in a different way.

These photos aren’t creepy, but they do capture a churchyard filled with peace and calm on a glorious, October afternoon.

Gate to St Mary Magdalene Church, Castleton, Sherborne, Dorset England (c) Sherri Matthews 2014

Gate to St Mary Magdalene Church, Castleton, Sherborne, Dorset England
(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

When I first met hubby, he enjoyed working as a stonemason at the weekends.  During their breaks, he and his friend often found themselves of a Saturday afternoon sharing sandwiches and drinking tea out of flasks while sitting on the wall of a cemetery deep in the Somerset countryside.

Views through the gate from both sides

Sometimes they worked on until well after sunset in the summer months, ‘fixing’ and repairing gravestones as well as setting new ones.  In my dark imagination, I conjured them up as a modern-day Burke and Hare lurking about the place with only the pale moonlight to guide their sinister steps.

(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

Part of their job was to clean up old gravestones. Hubby, being the artistic one, set to work carefully and respectfully engraving names and dates of beloved family members long gone but not forgotten.

(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

(c) Sherri Matthews 2014  These gravestones are so old that no names can be read.

One of the first things hubby did when I met him was to take me to a tiny churchyard somewhere in the wilds of Dorset and show me the gravestones of his maternal grandparents, buried side by side.  He was so proud to have been able to clean up their stones and re-do their engravings.  I thought it was the most romantic thing he could have done.

Holly growing along the wall.  A sign that winter is on its way? (c) Sherri Matthews 2014

Holly growing along the wall. A sign that winter is on its way?
(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

We love walking around old churches and their grounds when we get the opportunity.  Every name and every date on the gravestones tell a story, steeped in history as are the churches themselves.

On sunny afternoons such as these, beams of sunlight illuminate the warm stone inside the church through the leaded-light windows:

(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

The contrast of light and dark entranced me as the air hung colder and damper in this part of the churchyard, devoid of the warmth of the sun:

Light and Dark (c) Sherri Matthews 2014

Light and Dark
(c) Sherri Matthews 2014

I hope you enjoyed these photographs.  Here now is the next installment of Bill’s story in 99 words. Previous installments can be found here.

No Way Out Part Four: The Grave

Bill lurched backwards as disbelief spewed down on him like a black-as-death oil slick.

“Oh god…not Joey…”

Laura grabbed Bill’s arm.

“Someone knocked him off his bike, we’ve got to get to the hospital now… c’mon!”

Bill remembered the dead-eyed boy who haunted his dreams. Panic kicked his chest as he climbed into Laura’s car: he thought his days weeping at his son’s grave were over, with nothing left to lose.

At the hospital, fear leached from his brother’s broken body. Only the beep, beep, beep of the heart monitor played to the sick symphony of Bill’s long nightmare.

About Sherri Matthews

Sherri has been writing full time since 2011. Currently working on her memoir, 'Stranger in a White Dress', she has been published in a variety of national magazines, websites and three anthologies. Sherri raised her three, now adult children, in California for twenty years and today, lives in England’s West Country with her hubby, Aspie youngest, two cats, a grumpy bunny and a family of Chinese Button Quails. She keeps out of mischief blogging, gardening, walking by the sea and snapping endless photographs. Her garden robin muse vists regularly.
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86 Responses to Flash Fiction: No Way Out Part Four: The Grave

  1. suej says:

    I enjoyed the first part of your post about the stonemason’s work…. No Way Out got a bit bleak…..(but that’s the point, I know)

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  2. Denise says:

    The great run of fiction continues… I loved the stone mason story. It told me a lot about your husband, and also about the area you live in.

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  3. Your short story continues to hook me in Sherri, you really are a natural born writer. I also love your back story on the graveyard and most of all your husband taking to you through some family history. Kath

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  4. Oh my, my, my!!! Edge of my seat….this is worse than waiting for Stephen King “Green Mile”, remember? 🙂 Enjoying Bill’s story so very much. And I didn’t realize hubby did stone masonry and at cemeteries! That would be a dream job for me but alas not one artistic bone in my body. Touching, too, about first hubby & like you found that very sweet and yes, romantic. The photos are so serene and beautiful. Well done my friend! ❤

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    • Sherri says:

      Oh Diane, how can I forget? I wish I could write something like the Green Mile, one of my all time favourites by the ‘King’ 🙂 Remember when you got the books and handed them on to me? Was it weekly or monthly, I can’t remember? What hubby loved about it so much was the creative outlet it gave him and the peace and quiet so close to nature when out there in those cemeteries at all hours, away from the stresses of his day job. I loved the artistry of his engraving and how humbled he was to be able to do bring some measure of peace to families who were grieving for their loved ones. Thank you from my heart my friend ❤

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  5. Letizia says:

    There’s something so sweet about your date with Bill to the cemetery to show you how he restored his grandparents’ tombstones. The fact that you could recognize the artistry and the beauty of the cherished memory of his family no doubt cemented his love for you.

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…how lovely, thank you very much Letizia. I was very touched that hubby chose to share something so personal about his family with me so early on. His grandfather was a farm labourer who worked the fields from dawn to dusk taking a flagon of cider, a hunk of cheese and a whole onion for lunch, which he ate like an apple. No wonder he lived to his 80s. This despite being gassed in WWI. We can learn so much from such a stoic generation.

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      • Letizia says:

        He sounds like quite a man. I’m impressed by his lunch, although I think I will have to pass on the onion eaten like an apple. Although perhaps that’s the key to a long and healthy life. Simplicity and routine at least.

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  6. jennypellett says:

    On blimey, Bill’s story just gets darker. Good going, Sherri!
    Your graveyard pics, especially the holly, are fab. Well done 😉

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    • Sherri says:

      Yes Jenny, it got very dark this week didn’t it? But ’tis the way of it…for now. I’m particularly pleased you mentioned the holly, thank you. I admit, I was rather pleased with that one. I feel almost Christmassy looking at it…notice I said, almost 😉

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  7. I love graveyards – I don’t find them creepy at all – wonderful peaceful places full of history, atmosphere and wildlife, so your photos were just the way I think of them. And what a great chapter in your husband’s life. I love the atmosphere of the latest instalment…

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    • Sherri says:

      Me neither Andrea, they are places of such beauty and tranquility aren’t they? I love sharing these photos knowing you share the very same experience. Hubby and I often walk around churchyards and find great joy in doing so. And I’m delighted you enjoyed Bill’s latest story, thank you greatly for that 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Heyjude says:

    As you know I’m partial to a wander around a graveyard too, and I loved seeing this one. Great gate and window photos! As for Bill… well, what can I say. Now you have introduced yet another dimension. So Joey is his brother, but who is LAURA? And WHAT happened to his son?

    Have a good week Sherri – hope the writing is flowing 🙂

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    • Sherri says:

      Yes, I know how much you enjoy your atmospheric graveyard photos Jude 🙂 It was such a beautiful day last Sunday and I loved the way the late afternoon autumn light fell on everything. Like you, I was very taken with that gate…and as for Bill, yes, I know. Dark and a lot going on this week. Who knew? Yes, you are right, Joey is his brother. I’ll get to his son. Laura is Bill and Joey’s sister. But where is Bill’s wife? I’ve yet to find her…if at all…and let’s hope I can come up with a twist. Oh boy. Thanks Jude, I really appreciate that. Hope you’re having a good week too 🙂

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  9. TanGental says:

    I love cemeteries as you’ve probably gathered and the Dorset collection are fab. And the idea of being a stonemason and spending time with them is wonderful. The Archaeologist has done a study of the scratch sundials of Dorset and visited nearly every church to record them! Recently he took me to Cerne Abbas church which was beautiful. Have you seen any of his books on Dorset in the local shops? Sorry, a tangent!.
    Your flash is just the right side of morbid; perfect for the prompt. I hope you don’t mind if I make a suggestion? I would suggest it is a little confusing who is who in this one – Joey is Bill’s brother? Or his son? Another son? It might be the ‘bike accident’ that confuses. That suggests a push bike accident (so Joey is a boy?) but on second reading could it be a motorbike which would make sense for Bill’s brother? I might be getting things upside down (not for the first time and, if so, for which humble apologies) but if not I hope this helps.

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    • Sherri says:

      Hi Geoff. Yes, I’m glad you mentioned all this. I thought it was a tad confusing myself to be honest. I thought I tried to explain it within the 99 word constraint but ran into a tight problem I can see that but hoped maybe I got away with it…ha!
      Right, Joey is indeed Bill’s adult brother. Bill was thinking of his young son, who he lost many years before. It was his son he was thinking of when he almost crushed the toy yellow boat…maybe that was a stretch I know. When Bill got the repossession letter, it was the last straw. The bike is indeed a motorbike so you are spot on. I haven’t really described Bill so far as his age etc. sufficiently to expand this as I would if I wrote it in longer version. Really appreciate the feedback. This is bare bones, just going with it. It’s a bit like I’m writing a few notes here and then will add to it. Oh well, maybe I didn’t get it quite right this week…I thought about giving Bill a miss and doing something sufficiently creepy instead. Maybe I should have done that. But I take heart from the fact that you got everything right!!!!! No need to apologise, I welcome your insight, you are doing me a massive favour for which I thank you greatly 🙂
      Cerne Abbas church is one of my favourite places. A lovely walk there and must go again. Hubby knows so many churches throughout Somerset, Dorset and Wiltshire and has taken me to many over the years. He loved ‘moonlighting’ as a stonemason and would do it full time if he could. Darn the day job 😉 How wonderful about your Archeologist. I need to read more at your place about your family and I will be over shortly talking of which…and so far as his books, I probably have seen them. Dorset is my old stomping ground after all…

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  10. Hedwigia says:

    Loved the photos and the stone-masonry section. We visited Bath Abbey this weekend, and I found all the memorials to long-lost Georgians fascinating – I almost felt as though I’d been walking round with Jane Austen! The Georgian well-to-do were very wordy on their memorials!

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  11. Loved the photos of the churchyard. Your hubby and his colleagues really did some important work on those old gravestones. Kudos to them. I’m sure it meant so much to the relatives to know that someone actually cared enough to give up their time in this way. 🙂
    I continue to feel very worried about poor old Bill, and now his brother. Whatever next? 😕

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  12. Sherri says:

    Thanks so much Sylvia. Hubby did enjoy his stint as a stonemason so much, he would do it full time if he could. Don’t worry too much about Bill.. it is dark and morbid this week I know but it won’t always be this way…I hope o_O And again, I do so appreciate you reading on and bearing with me in this story 🙂

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  13. What a beautiful cemetery…that gated entrance is spectacular, Sherri! Did I ever tell you I worked at a cemetery for a brief period of time? No, I wasn’t a gravedigger…I have a bad back. I was in sales. 🙂
    Oh gosh! This Bill story has me biting off my fingernails and I’m not a nail bitter. Great job! xo

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    • Sherri says:

      No, I didn’t know that about you Jill, how fascinating! Haha…glad you put me right on that 😉 Well, I’m so glad you are still reading along with Bill, thanks very much for that. I feel I might have missed the mark a bit this week, a bit confusing perhaps…but it is only 99 words 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Love the pictures of the church and graveyard. Well maintained and lovely to see. Interesting about the stone mason background.
    You story about Bill is ready for continuation. You have my FULL attention. Loving it. ❤ ❤

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  15. I adore cemeteries, and you’ve used the ones in your surroundings to inspire!! They inspire me too, as does your stories. Good job Sherri.

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  16. Yolanda M. says:

    Lovely pics Sherri 🙂 I agree with you, your hubby did a super romantic thing taking you to his grandparents grave. I love cemeteries. I used to do most of my walking and thinking in the cemetery where my grandfather and father are buried. Poor Bill! I hope there is a light at the end of this dark tunnel of misery…

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…thanks so much Yolanda! Hubby reads my posts but he has been away so will be in for a surprise when he reads this one! With the theme for the flash running through it and thinking of the photos I took last weekend, it felt good to share his story 🙂 Cemeteries are so peaceful aren’t they? Yet so many creepy stories come out of them…and as for Bill, I do so appreciate you reading on but don’t worry…things are happening 😉 And I have to tell you, I really did absolutely love your story, I can’t stop thinking of Old Baker…he is firmly in my heart 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yolanda M. says:

        Aw Thank You Sherri ❤ I'm a big animal lover and most of my stories are populated with animals but I am very very fond of bears (it may have something to do with the fact that we live among black bears here) Grizzlies are the most awesome looking creatures. I remember bursting into tears (in a good way) the first time I saw one. He was that impressive lol…looking forward your next installment Sherri

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    • Sherri says:

      Yolanda, I would have done just the same thing. What an amazing moment that must have been for you, oh my goodness. In all the years I lived in CA I longed, I mean LONGED to see a bear. We used to go camping up in the redwoods by Big Sur as well as to the lakes not too far from us and I would marvel at the wooden boxes nailed up high on the trees for food storage and all the warnings to keep food locked away at night. We never did see a bear (never say never, right?) but one night we were awoken by a lot of snuffling going on and when we peeked through our tent window we were greeted by a family of wild pigs only feet away. A massive male, tusks and everything, a few females and the cutest, stripey and spotty little piglets I’ve ever seen. We had our lab Monty with us and he went berserk. My husband tried to restrain him but he went for the male and saw him off. I’ll never forget that night, there was our beautiful dog with pig blood on his nose and the three kids hugging him like he was the hero for the day, so relieved that he was ok, and Monty absolutely loving it 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I can see this flash as a flash novella. I’m glad you continued with Bill. I didn’t get that Joey was his brother and I thought he was riding a bicycle. It would be easy to clear that up by instead of saying bike use something like Harley or Triumph. Possibly my old memory doesn’t serve me well and I should have known Joey was his brother. Still I thought it was great and want you to continue. The thing I find with flashes – they suit darkness much better than laughter and light. Anyway the novella is a project for the future.
    Great photos as always.

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    • Sherri says:

      Thanks so much Irene, love your feedback.I can see I should have explained that a bit better with a better choice of words for Joey and the bike as I replied to Geoff. Still, you got the gist of it which I’m glad about. I gave no hint that Joey was Bill’s brother so it’s not your memory, I can assure you of that!! But knowing you still enjoyed it and are still on board with me is wonderful. I was bit afraid this one would tank o_O Oh I’m so glad you said that about the darkness of flash…I feel that too, and yes this is dark but then so is life sometimes. I love the free rein it gives us. BTW, talking of dark, I absolutely loved your flash as you know 🙂 Thanks for the ideas for a novella…hmmm…yes, I’m definitely thinking along these kind of lines. Let’s see what happens. Phew…I need a long walk after this my friend 😮 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I loved the photos as usual, Sherri. Yours made the cemetery look rather serene. I will admit they are not one of my favorite places. As for part four, it makes a very good “trailer” for a movie. Now you’ve got me wanting to read more… 🙂

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    • Sherri says:

      I’m so glad you enjoyed the photos Lilka, and didn’t find them spooky! I used to be quite frightened of cemeteries and still wouldn’t walk through one at night, but I love the wild and artistic beauty of them and the peace and quiet which seems to insulate from the noise ‘outside’.
      As for your comment about Bill’s story, wow! I’m thrilled to read this, thanks so much for that! I thought I’d tanked but so long as you and others enjoy reading on then I’m more than happy 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Charli Mills says:

    What a beautiful start to a relationship–grounded in the resting place of ancestors. I didn’t realize that stonemasons worked to repair the old stones like that. Sadly, they tumble in disrepair in many old cemeteries here and they aren’t near as old as in England! Beautiful, peaceful photos, too. It explains holly, too!

    Definitely a morbid, despairing turn to the flash. Creepy to be haunted by dreams and now I reflect on the yellow boat and it almost seems like it stalled what Bill had planned to do. Understandable the weight of many things upon this character. Great story that is unfolding!

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    • Sherri says:

      Charli, I’m whooping it up here! I’m SO glad you picked up on the yellow boat. YESSSSSSSS! Wow, you are good. I wondered if that would happen, by mentioning the little boy again. As the story continues, I’m bringing it back to that moment when everything did indeed stall that morning in the garage when Bill almost crushed the toy…and the significance of his memory of his little boy and the day out on the lake and how the repossession letter was the last straw…and…well, oh know, I want to write it all down and I’ve got to zoom out shortly to run long ignored errands. Darn. Stay thoughts, please stay… !
      As for the photos, I’m thrilled to share them with you. I didn’t know about that either until hubby explained to me what he did. He would have loved that job full time but the day job is what pays the bills :/ Talking to you about cemeteries and yours and hub’s wonderful story of your 25th wedding anniversary reminded me as you know of my early relationship with hubby so I thought it would be good timing to share this now. Thanks again for the opportunity to write over at the Ranch, I’m loving it 😀

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  20. bulldog says:

    I do love the flash fiction and how it is developing… as for the little reminiscing of old… brilliant… love the photos too…

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  21. restlessjo says:

    I have to be honest- I’m not a huge flash fiction fan, but I’m following with interest, because you’re you, Sherri. 🙂 I love the graveyard wander though. Funnily enough our walk last Monday included a stop at a village church with a nice old graveyard. Some of the walkers sat outside on a coffee break. I, of course, had to have a browse. 🙂 It must be a wonderful thing to do to be able to restore the gravestones. He definitely sounds to me like a ‘keeper’.
    Take care, and see you after your ‘break’. 🙂

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    • Sherri says:

      Jo, thank you so much,I love your honesty and I love that you are sticking with me on this despite flash fiction not being your thing…really means a lot that…goodness..so much 🙂 Ahh…yes hubby is definitely a keeper 😉 And your walk sounds divine. I would have been right there with you browsing around that old graveyard. I’m looking forward to your post and I’m definitely going to be doing a walk for you very soon, before I ride off into the sunset, so I’ll be seeing you before then 🙂

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  22. The story, irresistibly good! Thrilling and spellbinding. The images once again just take us to a place of wonder and awe. Spectacular, adventurous, captivating. Best of blessings to you and your family. God bless.

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    • Sherri says:

      Oh wow, thanks so much my friend, I’m thrilled to know you enjoyed the story and the photos so much. Best of blessings to you and your family too…always 🙂

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  23. I agree with Denise, Sherri! You talk about the things your husband enjoys doing by describing your trip. Makes him real to me. Your ongoing story is taking a creepy turn. But, for this time of year…….

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  24. I am enjoying Bills story. It feels real life to me. One challenge after another. We all get a little darkness so the sun feels better. You talk about your hubby with such sweetness and love. I agree that taking you to visit the cemetery to visit his ancestors was almost a first step to deciding if you were a good fit together. You get to see each others hearts that way. He sounds so special. I love the architecture and the gardens of old cemeteries. They aren’t creepy to me at all.

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…what a lovely comment, thank you so much Marlene, your words have really touched me. Hubby and I both grew up in rural parts of England, although hundreds of miles apart and then of course while he lived his life in the West Country (where we live now) I was in America for almost 20 years. We didn’t meet until our mid forties but when we did I do believe we met at the right time in both our lives. It just took an awfully long time and a lot of ups and downs (putting it mildly, ha!) on the way to get there 😉 Yes, I feel the same way about cemeteries…and the way all those wonderful stories ooze out of them. And I’m so glad you are still enjoying Bill’s story, thank you for that 🙂

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  25. Excellent details, Sherri, and like Hollis, I felt that your husband became real in this segment. And the pictures are outstanding. What an assortment! I didn’t find them creepy or bothering, but more as either a tribute, or a sad reminder, or those who lived and loved for awhile and then left for, hopefully, something better.

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    • Sherri says:

      I hadn’t intended to write about hubby in this post Marylin but in tying the photos to the the graveyard theme and the flash prompt, I found that they led me to share this part of his background. He reads all my posts so he was surprised, but happily so as I knew he would be…as I said to Hollis, he is a humble fellow 😉 I’m so glad you enjoyed the details, thank you for that Marylin 🙂

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  26. prior says:

    the photo part of the post = so moving! thx for that ❤ ❤ – and what a sweet man – to engrave the names – I agree – very romantic. 🙂
    also, this sold grave stones are historic – very unique and just enjoyed the different shares.

    and the story – looking forward to the next installment – enjoying this mon amie ….

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    • Sherri says:

      There certainly is a lot of deep history in this graveyard Y, most of the names and dates are long gone. Ahh…I’m really glad you got to know hubby a bit better 🙂 ❤ And thanks so much too for keeping with me on Bill's story… I got a few people confused (hubby included, ha, go figure!) in trying to keep it within the 'creepy' and cemetery theme for Charli's prompt. Let's see what happens next week mon amie 😀 ❤

      Like

  27. TBM says:

    What a beautiful cemetery and I enjoyed seeing the photos and hearing about your husband. I love wandering through the cemeteries in England. And I like the story … a lot packed into a few words.

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Oh thanks so much TB, I’m really glad you enjoyed it. I missed walking around old English church graveyards when I lived in CA and great to know you enjoy doing the same! Thrilled you are still enjoying the story and keeping with it…I hope I can do the same for a little while longer anyway 😉

      Like

  28. Luanne says:

    Poor Bill. Love the photos! Sherri, hubby and I visited three old cemeteries in Michigan. I took pix, too. I also noticed that granite stones hold up far better than marble! Hah. So many sad stories on those stones!

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    • Sherri says:

      Hi Luanne, great to ‘see’ you 🙂 Yes, poor Bill. Hopefully things will lighten up soon…I loved your post today with the covered bridge, so ‘Americana’ which of course I lap up. I can’t wait to see your pics. Hubby loves to tell me all about the different types of grave markers with granite used more these days for that very reason. Hope you are getting on top of ‘stuff’…have emailed you 🙂

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  29. I love the peace and beauty of graveyards next to country churches. Living in a town, I’m saddened that there’s no chance of ending up buried in the graveyard attached to our Parish Church as the council won’t allow it anymore.
    Sherri, you’re really heaping the agony on poor Bill. I’m wondering how much worse things are going to get for him!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh, met too Sarah. Yes, that is very sad…
      Arrgggghhhhh….I know! It got heavy this week didn’t it? Keeping in with the prompt it sort of took off this way. But Bill’s in for some ease this week, don’t worry… and thanks very much for reading on 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Ste J says:

    A post of two parts as Dickens would have said, the beginning did not prepare me for the drama of the story, I am still hooked on my tenter as well speak!

    I loved the first bit, you have beaten me to a graveyard post as I had one in the works, I will link yours to it when I am finished, methinks as they are very different. I love the feel and the photos, bright and sunny, wonderfully written as always and so full of life and personality. Just brilliant!

    Like

    • Sherri says:

      Well I do so adore your Dickensian critique and appreciation! I wasn’t prepared either…as the prompts go and then as I think of the story as it develops. Well…all I can is I am so happy you are still hooked! And oh, a great many thanks Ste, so glad you enjoyed this walk around the graveyard and honoured that you would link to it. Can’t wait to read your post 🙂

      Like

  31. Marie Keates says:

    Lovely graveyard photos. One of my favourite things is walking round a church heard looking at old graves. Glad to see Bill is still alive and well.

    Like

  32. Pingback: 99 Word Flash Fiction: No Way Out Part Five: Breathe | A View From My Summerhouse

  33. Pat says:

    Lovely photos and great flash fiction story about Bill. What an interesting occupation your husband has – stonemason. It must make him feel good to restore those old tombstones. 🙂

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    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Pat, I’m so glad you enjoyed both parts of this post. My husband’s day job is very different (he works in aerospace, for an American company actually!) but he worked as a stonemason at the weekends before I met him and for a little while after. He would have loved to worked full time, he is an artistic soul and he loves being outdoors in all weathers but with bills to pay it just wasn’t possible. I tell him that one day he should go back to it. I know he was never happier than when he was using his creativity in this way 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  34. Love the photos in this one! Gorgeous!

    Okay… What are you going to do with these stories? I know. You say in your “Breathe” post you’re not sure. I think you should, at the very least, compile them. Read through them again sometime (soon or take a break) and see if they inspire you to dig deeper. I like these…

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    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…so glad you enjoyed them. The warm, October sunshine late in the day gave a beautiful hue to the brickwork and gravestones as well as the gardens. I didn’t have my camera on me so I used my mobile phone (Android) and was pleased with the result. I’m no professional photographer but I do love taking photos, always have 🙂
      Love and appreciate your feedback on Bill. Writing fiction is a huge risk for me. I write memoir, slice of life, creative non-fiction and poetry. It’s through meeting Charli here and taking part in her wonderful weekly flash prompts that I first thought I would have a bash at it on a regular basis, loved it and then, well, along came Bill…so your encouragement means a great deal to me. Thanks so much Sarah. Since writing ‘Breathe’ and leaving Bill fighting back but still with his problems far from over, I am leaning towards taking him away for a time and digging deeper as you say, possibly for a novella? I would have loved to have done this for NaNo but I’m in the process of finishing up my draft of my memoir (a story I’ve wanted to write for over 30 years believe it or not!!) and I know I can’t do anything else until I’ve got this ‘out’. So a break from Bill might have to be in order while he bubbles on the back burner…but knowing you like the flash so far…well, that inspires me greatly 🙂 And I’m too far gone with Bill to just let him go… 😉

      Like

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