My Sandwich Generation And The Song Of The Summerhouse

What has happened to my ‘Great’ Britain, my ‘United’ Kingdom? Last Thursday, over thirty million people voted in the EU referendum,  out of which 52% voted to leave, 48% to stay. In Brexit’s thunderous wake, I, like millions of others, woke up on Friday morning in shock asking, ‘WTF just happened to our country?’

The fallout I feared kicked in immediately. Accusations of misinformation and misleading facts (lies?) now fly thick and fast.  Some are left wondering why those who made promises about pouring millions of pounds back into the NHS now avert their eyes away from their voters straight back down to the bottom of a beer glass.

A Dark Day For London (c) Sherri Matthews 2016

A Dark Day For London
(c) Sherri Matthews 2016

If some used their vote as a protest against ‘Just Call Me Dave’ and his broken promises, they got more than they bargained for: Yes, our Prime Minister failed us, but this wasn’t a general election and he got more than a black eye. He is crippled.

Our country is in leadership free-fall. Who will stand in the gap with the experience as Prime Minister to do what is right to put our nation back on its feet, to negotiate with the EU which is desperate to get us the hell out, now that Vote Leave has spoken?

Maybe I’m missing something but last time I looked, there was no sign of Winston Churchill and our finest hour is nothing but a distant memory.

And what of the great divide ripping apart my Beloved Broken Britain
across the generations?

I know what it’s like to live in a foreign country;  I lived in America for almost twenty years and raised my three children there.   I was welcomed into my new home, but I wasn’t a citizen so I couldn’t vote.

But the issues presented over the years mattered strongly to me, and I made sure that I understood what was at stake so at least I could talk about them with my friends and children as they grew up.

And one of the  greatest gifts I’ve been able to give each of my now adult children is dual British and American Citizenship. They have choices.

A new life in America (c) Sherri Matthews 2016

A new life in America 1987. Ronald Reagan was President, Margaret Thatcher Prime Minister
(c) Sherri Matthews 2016

And of course, they always had free movement across Europe.  But since Brexit, the generation gap, if embittered before, is now a stinking, gaping wound with our adult children feeling betrayed by their parents and grandparents who, they believe, have destroyed their future by voting Leave.

Figures from this YouGov poll show the huge voting disparity between the generations:

18-24: 75% remain
25-49: 56% remain
50-64: 44% remain
65+:     39% remain

The Guardian’s online article quotes:

“I’m so angry,” wrote one Twitter user. “A generation given everything: free education, golden pensions, social mobility, have voted to strip my generation’s future.” Another statement, from a commenter on the Financial Times website that has been widely shared, summed up the sense of furious betrayal among the young: “The younger generation has lost the right to live and work in 27 other countries. We will never know the full extent of lost opportunities, friendships, marriages and experiences we will be denied. Freedom of movement was taken away by our parents, uncles and grandparents in a parting blow to a generation that was already drowning in the debts of its predecessors.”

I feel their pain. I feel my children’s pain.  This is why I voted Remain, to stand in solidarity with my children. But things are not what they seem when looking at statistics.

Although a whopping seventy-five percent of 18-24 year olds voted to remain, it is estimated that only thirty-six percent of that age group actually voted.

Because I didn’t have the vote for almost twenty years, I rammed down my children’s throats the vital importance of what it means to have the privilege – not the right – to vote, and that they must always, always use it.  I’m proud of my children for voting.

Every vote counts, each one.  Otherwise our voice is just a whisper in the wind.

But what of my generation, the baby boomers who apparently have it all? What of our voice?

Not all of us can take early retirement with golden hand-shake pensions, houses paid for and travel at will.  Some of us in our mid-fifties missed that boat as we face many more years of hard graft, mortgages to pay and a cosy retirement disappearing as fast as our nest egg, if we ever had one at all.

And some of have elderly parents to look after with adult children still living at home, some with physical and/or mental disabilities.  We work hard as unpaid carers, advocating and supporting our loved ones as they navigate a depleted NHS under severe strain thanks to government cutbacks.

We do the best we can to give our children the best we can, helping them financially, looking after grandchildren and guiding them through life crises.  We do it because we love them. Just like our parents loved us. And all the while hoping to God our health holds out in the years to come so that by the time we reach our so-called ‘golden years’, we won’t be too knackered to enjoy what’s left of them.

We are the Sandwich Generation and we are silent.

Finger-pointing and blame, whatever our generation, whichever way we voted, or look like or where we come from, is destructive and dangerous. I worry about the contagion of this ‘Brexit effect’ and the bitterness and anger and the appalling racism arising out ot it.  We need to pull together more than ever at a time like this.

Can Britain be Great again?  What of our England? And trust me, I am not taling about the football here…

On a lighter note, I have discovered that since I had an Irish grandmother, I am eligible for an Irish passport.  Not sure how that affects hubby or my children, but at least there is a glimmer of hope if things go completely tits-up here.  Funny, I’ve always wanted to go to Ireland…

I didn’t want to write about such a heavy subject.  This post was supposed to be about my generation, but only because I wanted to join in with Irene’s  Time’s Past Challenge, ‘Reflection on Favourite Childhood Meals‘.

I planned to tell you that growing up in a village in Surrey, then Suffolk in British 60s and 70s,  I wondered if my memories of meal times might be more unusual than most.

Sometimes all you need is a cup of tea...and someone to drink it with (c) Sherri Matthews 2016

Sometimes all you need is a cup of tea…and someone to drink it with…and to keep calm
(c) Sherri Matthews 2016

For one thing, I remember my mother making lasagna for us, but when I told my friends at school the next day (we liked to swap mealtime stories for some reason), none of them knew what lasagna was. This would have been the mid 1970s, around the time Britain joined the European Economic Community as it was then called.   No irony there then.

I wanted to tell you that my tastes were typically British – favourites were roast lunches on Sunday, usually chicken, sometimes beef as a treat with Yorkshire pudding, Shepherd’s Pie or stews and casseroles. I was wary of anything more adventurous.

This I blamed on being scared out of my wits one afternoon by the sight of a pheasant hanging by its green, scaly feet from the cloakroom (bathroom) ceiling as  black, thick blood slowly dripped from its beak into a bucket.  Dinner, thanks to a gift from a friendly farmer who no doubt fancied my mother.  Or maybe it was road kill?  I can’t remember.

But I do remember refusing to eat it when Mum presented it on the table as a casserole.  I couldn’t bear the thought.

I also hoped to share some photos from Stourhead for Jude’s June: The Essence of Summer garden photography challenge. Goodness knows, the Summerhouse needs some colour and beauty to lift the mood…

And then I wanted to update you about my daughter’s (Aspie D)  Chinese Button Quails who are now living outside in an aviary, very happy in their new home I’m pleased to say.

New home for Chinese Button Quails (they all shot inside so can't see them sadly, will work on that for another photo). Notice they now live by the side of the Summerhouse :-) (c) Sherri Matthews

New home for Chinese Button Quails (being skittish, they all shot inside so can’t see them sadly, but will work on that for another photo). Notice they now live by the side of the Summerhouse 🙂
(c) Sherri Matthews 2016

But sadly, poor Raisin (Mooncake’s (the only male) second wife) died.   Now we have five, all healthy and happy, but raising button quails is a delicate task, one Aspie D takes very seriously.

Some of you may remember this photo of the darling chicks from last year:

Newly hatched Chinese Button Quails, June 2015 (c) Sherri Matthews

Newly hatched Chinese Button Quails, June 2015
(c) Sherri Matthews

Here is one of them now, all grown up (which happened within a couple of weeks
of the above photo!) ~

This is Marmalade, daughter of Mooncake and Raisin (c) Sherri Matthews 2016

This is Marmalade, daughter of Mooncake and Raisin
(c) Sherri Matthews 2016

We have a personal battle: Aspie D’s care-coordinator from the Asperger Specialist Team has handed in his notice and is leaving with no replacement (cut backs in mental health are dire). We are back to where we started three years ago with the search for proper support while she makes her way in life.  And she will find her way.  I know it.  But the next few months will be tricky for many reasons.

And then, as ever, there is the memoir. I’ve hit a wall and I can’t seem to punch my way through…

So what to do? Well, dear friends, sadly I am going to have to part ways with blogging for a while.  I admit I am struggling and I need to take a step back to focus on my family and finishing my book.  My plan is to return in September with a new strategy, a new way forward, a new push in all my writing/blogging.

I’ll love and leave you with this song, Duck and Run by 3 Doors Down, one of my all time favourite bands and a song I’ve listened to since my Californian days.  This message keeps me fighting as it did then through turmoil of a different kind.   It is my mantra and for all those who feel disaffected: we might be down but we won’t run.

I’ve made it the official Song Of The Summerhouse.

I’m taking a blogging break, but I’m not going anywhere.  Stay with me, will you?

I will miss you all, dear friends, but I wish you a most wonderful, safe, joy-filled summer.
See you in September!

Love Sherri xxx

About Sherri Matthews

Sherri has been writing full time since 2011. Currently working on her memoir, 'Stranger in a White Dress', she has been published in a variety of national magazines, websites and three anthologies. Sherri raised her three, now adult children, in California for twenty years and today, lives in England’s West Country with her hubby, Aspie youngest, two cats, a grumpy bunny and a family of Chinese Button Quails. She keeps out of mischief blogging, gardening, walking by the sea and snapping endless photographs. Her garden robin muse vists regularly.
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150 Responses to My Sandwich Generation And The Song Of The Summerhouse

  1. MarinaSofia says:

    Thank you for this beautiful post, both text and pictures. Wishing you a good blogging break and looking forward to having you back soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Marina, I hope you have a wonderful summer and I look forward to seeing you when I return 🙂

      Like

      • mijo1947 says:

        Sitting here in France I agree with your sentiments and am so worried about Britain now – I just couldn’t believe the vote could go that way.
        I hope its a good summer for you all. Love your tea set and the embroidered cloth – old is so often beautiful! Good luck with the memoir…

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          I am so sorry it’s taken me this long to reply to you mijo, I am barely returning to blogging after taking my break, as sadly not long in, my dad was taken seriously ill and died, which I’ve found hard to recover from. But yes, and here we are September and still wondering where we’re going as a country. And thank you so much for your kind good wishes…I’ve starting on the revisions again only in the last couple of weeks. I’ve missed visiting France this year, still remember our holiday there this time last year with my family. Will certainly return. I hope you’ve had a wonderful summer, lovely to hear from you again.

          Like

  2. Norman says:

    A great post to sign off (for a while) with. Enjoy your summer and I look forward to your return. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. restlessjo says:

    Beautifully articulated, Sherri, as I might have expected. We can’t all agree or have the same viewpoint, hon, but why we have to do it with such venom and rancour, ably orchestrated by the media and their overload of ‘facts’, I do not know. I am ashamed of some of my countrymen. I am embarrassed on behalf of my Polish family in this country, who have worked hard to give their children a better future. I don’t want to hear or read any more.
    I hope that Aspie can find good support again. I know from my own experience how difficult a battle that is. Thank God for the chicks 🙂 🙂 I’m finding a smile and a hug from somewhere, hon, but goodness knows where. Good luck with the book. You know we believe in you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh dear Jo…I hear you and your pain for your dear Polish family living here. It is utterly appalling what is happening, I am disgusted and it is exactly what I feared would get even worse with Brexit.
      Thank you so much about Aspie D…I am dreading it, it’s not going to be easy and I am not in the mood for these kind of battles, but I need to gird myself – again. It’s exhausting. But yes…ha! Thank God for the chicks indeed!!! The bond between her and her chicks is something to behold.
      I hope you find a smile and a hug from me and the Summerhouse Jo…and thank you so much for believing in me… I’ve got to find my way through.
      I’ll be over to you before heading into the sunset! Get ready for those hugs…they’re coming over right now 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Beautiful post, Sherri. I avoid talking politics on social media, but I have to agree with our friend Jo about the media…they add fuel to the fire. Sadly, they make is so you don’t want to hear the news, but we must stay informed.
    Continued prayers for Aspie D, my friend.Her chicks sure have grown…so sweet.
    Relax and enjoy your break. Thank you for sharing your beautiful photos! Chat with you via email. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Jill, and for your prayers for Aspie D. I thought you’d enjoy the photos 🙂 I so much didn’t want to bring politics into the Summerhouse, or on social media, I hoped to be able to express my thoughts here without doing that. It’s such a difficult time and yes, I agree also with our friend Jo, the media adds plenty of fuel to the fire. And so we press on. I know how tense things are in the USA, and of course, as with Brexit, the election results will have a huge worldwide ripple effect. Deep breath…see you by email my friend! 🙂 ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Andy Oldham says:

    Thanks for sharing your perspective on Brexit. The photos and stories are very nice. I especially enjoyed a minds eye view of your seeing the pheasants demise. Blessings!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Andy, lovely to hear from you! This wasn’t an easy post to write but I needed to share what was on my heart and hopefully shed some light on my generation’s perspective that isn’t talked about very much. We are all hurting! Glad you enjoyed the pheasant story – I had quite the shock with that! Blessings to you my friend, I hope you have a wonderful summer and I look forward to visiting you when I’m up and running again 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. jennypellett says:

    Brilliant and brave post Sherri. I’ve read it in my lunch time and am just about to go back into class but will reply properly later. Thank you for voicing your thoughts which I think will be shared by more than 48%.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Thanks so much Jenny, great to hear from you. It’s not easy putting posts up like this, but with everything flying around on social media it’s clear there is so much anger out there. We need respect on all sides! Look forward to hearing from you later… xx

      Like

  7. Imelda says:

    Hi, Sherri. I wish you and your country well. I have faith in the resilience and talent if your people to find opportunities amidst closing doors. You have a long history of greatness and survival, your country will be fine in the long run.

    It seems that everywhere, there is a quiet warfare, should I say, between classes, not necessarily rich or poor in this case. People are in different life situations and thus have different wants and needs. It happens, and just happened, in my home country. The intellectual and economic elite are often in disagreement with the simpler folks. It is almost the same here in America, at least from my limited view. I often get frustrated that what I think is best is not accepted by the rest of the people. I guess, it’s part and parcel of living in society. But then, we always survived, sometimes, almost barely, but we do.

    I hope you will pass through your latest writing obstacle and “I’ll see you in September…” 🎶🎼🎻

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh…’quiet warfare’… You put it so eloquently Imelda. It is everywhere it seems and I share your frustration. The gap between the classes, the generations, the haves and have-nots is growing ever deeper and it is deeply troubling. The younger generation are quick to blame the older generation for ‘ruining their future’, yet some fail to remember their great-grandparents who fought in terrible world wars to secure that very future, to give them the very freedom they have today, enabling them to vote in the first place! I thank you for the faith you have in my country, I take heart that we will indeed prevail and come through this if we can heal and overcome. I hope to return with the good news of having completed my memoir…and again, thank you so much my friend for your amazing support. I wish you and your lovely family a wonderful summer…I’m singing with you now!…and a great July 4th 🙂 ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Imelda says:

        I am sorry for my always late replies. I am here and then not here, I am inspired to write and then not inspired to write.

        I hope things have settled down a bit in your country, heads had had a time to cool down since the momentous vote. Resentments will always simmer – for as long as humans are humans, and there are humans. That makes life a little interesting (just no bloodshed, please).

        Happy writing. One day soon, we’ll find your book in store shelves. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          Dear Imelda, it is always such a pleasure to hear from you. I take great heart from your kind words and encouragement. I hope you are enjoying a beautiful summer. Sadly, two weeks after I signed off my blog, I got news that my dear dad was taken seriously ill and he died 5 days later. This is the first time I’ve checked my blog for many weeks, and I’ve been absent from all social media while I grieve for the dad I adored. I hope to wind my way back slowly. And I did return to my memoir for the first time this past week, which has helped. Thank you so much for keeping in touch… Sherri xoxo

          Like

          • Imelda says:

            Aw, Sherri, I am so sorry about the loss of your father. I have no words to console you – but that I’ll keep you in prayers and pray for your father’s eternal repose. Take all the time you need, I’ll be around (still with some silly words to post, I hope) to say hello when you come by. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  8. Jools says:

    An impassioned response to last week’s dismal outcome, but I’m so glad you offset it with your wonderful selection of photos. Have a lovely summer-blogging-break, Sherri. See you on the other side!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Dismal indeed Jools…what a nightmare! I’m so gald you enjoyed the pics, I couldn’t leave things on such a heavy note, but since this is my last post for a while, I also needed to share my thoughts. Thank goodness for the beauty of the English countyside! Thank you so much, I hope you have a wonderful summer too and yes, definitely, see you on the other side for sure!!! 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I am Australian and we are all astounded over here that such a crucial issue could be left to the whims of a referendum. It is one thing to have democratic elections … but at least if the vote at an election turns into a disaster it can be undone at the next election. Not so with Brexit. This is forever. And I do not think the 52% realized exactly what they were doing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      I agree Elizabeth, we are hearing that a fair number of those 52% are now regretting their vote, saying they did not fully understand the ramifications, being mislead by a campaign rife with misinformation – if not out and out lies. This has been the problem from day one. So much was left up in the air giving certain powers-that-be an opportunity to use the referendum for their own political ends, which have backfired with deeply troubling consequences. Now we are left to pick up the pieces. I hope we can find our way back, I have to believe that we will…

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Interesting statistics. I wonder how many of the people who didn’t bother to vote are grumbling about the result now. Hopefully, it will be possible to negotiate a Norwegian-style agreement with Europe. Also, Brexit never called for an end to immigration, but for tighter immigration controls, so I’m sure that some people will still be allowed dual citizenship. Unfortunately, the Media is, as ever, whipping everything and everyone up into a frenzy and flaming discord wherever it can. I think Cameron did his best to achieve what he promised in his manifesto, but failed. There’s so much scapegoating going on, as per usual.
    Anyway, your post is bravely and passionately written, dearest Sherri. We must now pray that when the pack of cards that has been tossed up in the air, falls to the ground, we can gather it up into some semblance of order and unity.
    Meanwhile, what better than to look at your lovely photos and remember that there is still great beauty in this world, amidst the mayhem.
    Best of luck with your sabbatical from blogging to complete your memoir. We’ll keep in touch and I’ll cheer you on to the finishing line! Love and hugs, my dear friend. xxxxxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh, dearest Sarah, what a time we are living through. There is no doubt that the campaign on both sides was so badly run and so many just didn’t know what to vote for, in the end going by what they believed was the right thing to do. And then with the media throwing fat on the fire, it’s not been pretty has it? Now we’re left wondering who on earth is going to lead us through this mess? I agree, David Cameron failed in his negotiations and here we are living with the consequences. What a mess. But yes, we do need to take heart and let’s hope that we will come through this and find our way back. Think we’re going to have to drink a lot of tea to keep calm this time 😉 I’m so glad to share the photos, we need that beauty and calm don’t we? Thank you so much my dear friend for your support and encouragement…I need to hear your cheering, I really do!! And yes, we will definitely keep in touch…big hugs to you and much love… 🙂 ❤ xxxx

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’ll add cake to the tea, although my latest cake fell apart, which is an unusual event as my baking usually goes well. I’ve left the cake upside down and am hoping it will cool down into some semblance of order. I think it’s symbolic of the UK. Let it cool off, mend, then apply the icing sugar! 🙂 xxxx

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          Ha! I think you’re on to something there Sarah, not to mention leaving the cake upside down. Let’s hope indeed having time to cool off does the trick! Hope you’re having a lovely weekend my friend…and I’m sure your cake tasted scrummy, with or without icing 🙂 xxxx

          Liked by 1 person

  11. Sue says:

    I agree with Jo…beautifully articulated post, Sherri….wishing you all the best for your struggles on behalf of Aspie D, and sending love and hugs. Sounds like you need a break, and I find myself with little appetite for life at present. I am truly ashamed of some of my countrymen. Look after yourself xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Sue. I am ready for a break, even though I will miss being here, but I know I have to do this. It’s tough times for our country isn’t it? And I share your sorrow… You do the same, take care, and enjoy the summer – that is, if we ever have one in all this rain of late! See you in September Sue… xx

      Liked by 1 person

  12. jennypellett says:

    So here I am, back again. Firstly, I’m really sorry to hear of the resignation of your daughter’s support worker. As we all know, change is a difficult thing to cope with especially if you’re on the spectrum. I wish you all well in finding some sort of alternative care that will be the most appropriate for C.
    Next…to Brexit. How I hate that word. I toyed with the idea of having a rant over at mine but to be honest, I just don’t have the time to field and reply to comments and confrontation at the moment so I avoided it! I’ve been reading many angles though, both in the papers and online as well as the blogs. I’m astounded that those who voted leave thought they’d use it as a protest vote and now feel offended that they are being dubbed as lacking intelligence or, heaven forbid, racist. There is no clear plan from those who ran the campaign – and quite frankly, anything that Michael Gove hangs his hat on is going to fail – look what he did for education ( don’t get me started!). Boris is a dangerous egocentric maniac with a Churchill complex. If he thinks he can lead us out of this mess with a load of jingoistic rhetoric then he really is the buffoon he so cleverly pretends to play.
    Sorry, I seem to have started my own rant here. I’ve just had tea with a friend and we’ve been firing each other up! I do think the media have stirred things up but let’s face it, the media has and always will do that and it’s up to measured and well informed individuals to make up their own minds. It’s a shame that such a large percentage of the 18-24 year age group failed to turn out to vote but you see I put that down to an education system that is so lacking in content that politics and current events are never discussed – certainly not in secondary school. When I was that age I was able to name both the cabinet and shadow cabinet MP’s – and I wasn’t alone or weird amongst my peers. We were interested and it mattered and once we were 18 and could vote nothing would have held us back. So there we are, Michael Gove’s education policy helped him win the vote to ruin our country, if you follow my logic!
    I’ll stop now and say how adorable your chicks are and good luck with the memoir. I’m back seat blogging too for the foreseeable future so will be in touch via email. Have a good productive summer and best wishes to you all. Jenny xx

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sherri says:

      Jenny, dear Jenny…and here I am at last replying to your part two! Love your comment, and I agree absolutely on all counts. And isn’t it ironic that since you typed this, Boris Johnson (I had to LOL at your description!!) has stepped down and Gove is running for Prime Minister…..I say what??????? Then again, why should we be surprised at this? And I do see your logic, most clearly. The dumbing down of our country’s educational system has a lot to answer for. Apparantely some of the younger group, when interviewed at Glastonbury about Brexit, gave the excuse that they wanted to vote but couldn’t because although they took their polling cards with them, they were annoyed to find that there were no polling stations at Glasto. Others were annoyed because they complained they couldn’t do so online and so they weren’t going to bother. I read this in The Guardian. Heaven help us!!!! And it is the ‘protest vote’ that really burns me. Ah…we could talk all day about this, but all we can do is to wait and see what other shocks await…or perhaps there will be some good news, wouldn’t that be lovely! Thank you so much for your concern for Aspie D, you know only too well what change means for her and this has been really tough. In the entire county of Somerset there is only one Asperger Specialist team and now there is no psychologist and everyone is immediately referred to mental health after diagnosis. Nothing has changed at all, in fact, it’s got worse thanks to the cut backs in mental health. I can only hope I don’t run into the previous social worker from 3 years ago or there will be fireworks…! I hope you too have a lovely summer my friend and look forward to keeping in touch by email during our blogging breaks 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  13. There is so much turmoil and stress in the world these days. I wish you all the best. The LEAVE vote has indeed rocked not just Britain but the world. Wish you all the best, Sherri. Happy writing.
    I’m taking time out as well. Waiting for my fifth blogoversary shortly to vow out for the summer. It’s difficult serving two masters: blogging and writing. I sooo understand. 🙂 ❤ ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much Tess, and I know you understand about serving those two masters, it’s a huge challenge isn’t it? I started blogging at the same time I started writing my memoir. No wonder it’s taken me so long lol!!! Wow, five years? That’s an amazing achievement! I’ll have to look out for your post before I disappear, can’t let that go!
      But yes, the ‘Brexit Effect’ has spread far and wide it seems. Our world is indeed in great turmoil. See you soon my friend 🙂 ❤ ❤ 🙂

      Like

  14. What a lovely Quail house! They are such darling little creatures. Hope you manage to get everything sorted out this summer, Sherri. I’ll miss you, but of course, you’re unforgettable, so you’ll still be in my thoughts. Love your theme song. Take care. *hugs* xx

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Aww, Sherri, I’m so sorry about all the turmoil. If the youngers really wanted their way, then all of them should have voted. Just sayin.
    I know what you mean about the sandwich, I’m firmly in one, myself!!
    I will miss you!! Take a break, breathe! Tend to real life, and we’ll all be here in Sept, eagerly awaiting your return!
    Love, Melinda

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      I agree Melinda, absolutely. I hope lessons are learned here. Ha…you know how it feels, and we ain’t talking peanut butter and jelly here LOL 😀 I’ll miss you too my friend, and I will vist you as soon as I return, you can count on it. Thank you so much for all your amazing support and encouragement and for letting me you you’ll be here when I return. You’re a star. I wish you and your family, whichever side of the sandwich they’re on, a wonderful summer and I’ll see you in the fall but before then, have a great July 4th!!
      Love & hugs… ❤ xo

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Blogging breaks seem to be all the rage at the moment Sherri – apparantly I’m almost two months into one myself 🙂 like the rest of the world I was left dumbfounded by the results of your referendum – but it seems to me that so much of the world is in political free-fall at the moment that really nothing should be too unexpected. I remain convinced that all this chaos will eventually work itself through. We won’t hear about it from the fourth estate and it won’t come from our governments or ‘leaders’. Good people, doing good things are found in the community amongst ordinary people and you see signs of it in the oddest places – and sometimes stumble over something in a Ted Talk. I am certain there is a change coming that will be led by the young ones, outside of political/corporate auspices and which will slough off all that needs to be sloughed off. In the meantime, Ireland is [or was] a lovely place 🙂 Have a productive time Sherri. My heartfelt best wishes that everything works out for you and Aspie D better than you could ever have imagined. xoxo

    Liked by 3 people

    • Sherri says:

      Dear Pauline, I still feel shocked. But…I love what you share here, and I believe the same, things certainly do need to change, big time, and hopefully all this painful upheaval is the start of the ‘sloughing off’ process you speak of so eloquently. We need to remain optomistic and I do have faith in my fellow Brits that we’ll find our way through this very difficult time. And thank you so much as always for your heartfelt messages of comfort and kindness which help me and Aspie D along our way. I hope by September to return with a bundle of good, positive news, on all fronts! Hopefully no emergency moves to Ireland before then! 😉 Blogging break trending…who knew! I have stopped by now and then to check in with you but noticed you’ve been gone a while. I imagine you’ve been busy with all your various projects and it’s lovely to hear from you and know you’re okay. I’ll look for you on FB too, and I wish you not a lovely summer but a not too chilly winter…did I get that right? See you soon my friend and big hugs to you and sweet Siddy and Orlando 🙂 ❤

      Like

  17. Ste J says:

    It is a time of upheaval but I hope things will work out for us in the long term which I think it shall but then again who knows.

    Once again we shall miss you in the blogging world but it will also be a delight to have you back and September isn’t too far away. Jeep awesome my friend and as ever should you wish anything just drop me a Stemail anytime you need.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Oh I hope so too Ste, I really do. Tumultous times, we can only sit tight, hold on for dear life and get ready for a very bumpy ride! And roller coasters scare the wits out of me! I’ll miss you too, but thanks for the Stemail offer and will check in before I disappear and as you say, September will be here before we know it. Hopefully things will be a bit calmer for us by then. I dream of the day when you review my book…can you imagine that? I need to get to work, a big mountain to climb yet! I hope you have a good, productive summer…just a little more sunshine would be nice 🙂 Take care of yourself my friend.

      Like

  18. Heyjude says:

    The sandwich generation! I like that and know exactly what you mean. I don’t think our generation have been handed everything on a plate, we have had to survive some tough times and economic depressions more than once. I love your photos – I shall look at them and feel happy and hope that Aspie D finds her way in life. Maybe some kind of job working with animals? She seems to have bonded well with the birds. As for the EU, well, I’m not so pessimistic. I think we ARE a great country and we will sort ourselves out. There is nothing stopping folk from living and working abroad, I did it before we were in the EU – just meant having a work visa. if there is a will there is often a way and that applies to a lot of things in life. Life is what you make it and sitting on ones backside and expecting jobs and homes and money to fall into your lap is all too easy for some people. You have to make it happen and I know you know what I mean. Stay well Sherri and have a relaxing summer. Email me if needs be – I shall be around 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      I agree Jude, it is wrong to judge the ‘older’ generations, forgetting what we have worked for, the struggles we’ve had and not to mention, worked really hard for to give our children a better way of life!! I like your optimism, I’ll take that please! And oh how I do know just what you mean – life ain’t coming to you, you’ve gotta go out and get it, absolutely! Thank you so much for your encouragement for Aspie D, and interesting you say that because she really does want to work with animals in some way. We are working on helping her anxiety to enable her to pursue this at some time down the road. She has a real gift with them, and they are drawn to her too, really quite something. I shall look forward to keeping in touch by email, and hearing news of your new life by the Cornish sea. So glad you enjoyed the photos, I was thrilled to at last capture some rhodendruns at Stourhead as I seem to only go there in the autumn and winter! Beautiful all year round though. Be in touch soon… 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Oh, Sherri, before anything else, I want to say that–although I wasn’t “there” for it–what you describe about the “next morning woes” after deciding to leave…sound so very much like all I’ve read about America’s pain, anger, fear, reluctance and worries after breaking away from…oh-oh, guess who we broke away from!?! Ours was a bloody battle, according to all accounts, and yet, in the end, the dust settled, the water calmed, and life went on. 🙂
    You lived here and raised your children here (pretty much), so you know it’s not perfect, and we definitely have our struggles, but we still are trying, and so will you and yours across the ocean.

    Sherri, while I will miss you while you focus on your writing and all that needs to be done, I also say a heartfelt BRAVA! writeWriteWRITE, dear Sherri, knowing we all wish you well and are very proud of you. Much love and high hopes! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Oh yes, now who could that be I wonder? Ha! Well, that is very timely, with July 4th around the corner, a holiday this Brit has so many happy memories of spent at the beach with my children 🙂 Thank you so much for your optimism and encouragement, I need some of that right now! And of course for your always amazing support of my writing. Knowing I have that propels me forward and keeps me on track, writing ever closer to that finish line.
      Ahh dear Marylin, I will miss you too, but I will look out for you on FB! Meanwhile, I wish you and your dear family a wonderful summer and a happy July 4th weekend. Much love back to you…and I will take hold of those high hopes, you betcha!! ❤ xo

      Like

  20. Sunni Morris says:

    Sherri.

    Sorry to see you go, but I do know breaks are needed. I’d like to take one sometimes with too much going on in life. I hope you have a wonderful summer and can get all together for your return in Sept.

    Beautiful pics of the gardens. It’s hard to believe how lovely mother nature can be after the rough winters. Somehow life thrives on.

    Sunni

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Sunni, and thank you so much. I do so much enjoy our chats 🙂 I look forward very much to catching up with you in the autumn (fall!) and I will be sure to visit you as soon as I do so. So glad you enjoyed the garden pics. My garden is looking lovely at this time of year, I ran out of time to post pics, but then we had some storms and my poor roses got a bit battered. But, as you say, somehow life thrives, and now they are fully recovered! I hope we can do the same as a nation…and of course, thinking of you and the turmoil in America.
      Have a wonderful summer my friend, I hope you get to have that well-needed break…and a happy July 4th! 🙂 xo

      Like

  21. You expressed yourself quite well here, Sherri and I am obviously joining you on the blogging hiatus. Just can’t get there these days. Life is about change! It must change and change is uncomfortable in any form. Money is a vibration of what we value. Your economy will balance out and possibly come back stronger than ever. I’m not a fan of a globalized government and that starts with globalized money. I like our differences. I certainly don’t want to go to a Chinese restaurant to order and hamburger and fries. 😦 I am sorry though that your once again having struggles to get the proper help for your daughter. She is here to teach us something. The aviary looks cocooned in that little corner of your yard. Safe and cozy. Those birds are just adorable and how could you not treasure them. Enjoy your hiatus and we will see you soon all charged up and ready to go. Holding you in my thoughts and prayers for a good outcome.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Dear Marlene, I have popped over from time to time to check up on you and noticed that you have been away for a little while. I’m so happy to hear from you and know you are okay. As Pauline says in her comment, it seems a few of us are taking blogging breaks at the moment. Must be something in the air – life keeping us busy, which ,of course, is a good thing 🙂 I totally agree with you about change. I hoped that by a good percentage voting remain (and I think even most of the Leave voters were stunned that they actually won…) that a message would go out to our government that we were not happy with David Cameron’s failure to secure the deals we wanted at the EU and that he would listen to the people and continue to work on reform. But this has knocked us all for six and it is the chasms of discontent that has since ripped across the generations (and in ugly, ugly racism by some – the minority, but it’s always them we hear about – ). I hope we can return to our ‘Great’ British values of tolerance, kindness, fairness, justice and decency. I have faith that we will, and also that we will be able to secure deals with the EU that benefit us all, while protecting our soveignity. Ahh…we could talk all day! And thank you so much for your kind thoughts, prayers and well wishes. I’m so glad you enjoyed the pics. The aviary was a lightbulb moment, one we wondered why on earth we hadn’t thought of before! Daughter is in the midst of having a massive clear out of her room, so the house is in a bit of disarray at the moment, but will be so much better when all done and helps keep her mind off the days ahead when she faces meetings with people she doesn’t know and which, for those like her with Asperger’s, is an absolute nightmare. I will be with her though, all the way…until she tells me she’s okay to go on her own. Three years rapport built up with her previous care worker and that’s all gone…and so we move forward…
      I hope you have a wonderful summer my friend. And yes, I hope I return charged up! I need to be, and I am resolved not to do so until I can say, guess what, I did it, I finished my memoir and it’s with the editor!!!! Oh what a happy day that will be! See you in the autumn…and have a great July 4th! 🙂 ❤ xo

      Liked by 1 person

      • I was just watching CBS’s Sunday Morning and they had on Garrison Keillor. He did a radio show called the Prairie Home Companion and wrote a book on a fictional town of Lake Wobegon. He spoke to some degree on the fact that he was for many years undiagnosed with Asperger’s and on the spectrum of high functioning Autism. He is 73 and that will educate a few more people. I think there are many people out there who are struggling and don’t know what is different about them. As for the rest, I’m sure there is a divine plan to all this chaos. I keep praying there is anyway. I’ll be waiting to hear that you are finished.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          What a fascinating man, thank you for telling me about him. His story will help many I’m sure. You are right Marlene, it is not uncommon for adults in their 50s, 60s and beyond to receive a diagnosis of Asperger’s because they struggle on and find a way to cope as best they can with the challenges of daily life, but are left wondering why they struggle so much. Diagnosis brings huge understanding. And yes, we can but hope and pray…thank you so much Marlene. Big hugs xo

          Liked by 1 person

  22. Too many wise thoughts in your post, Sherri, to comment on each one. Since I’ve left France when Europe was still in its gestating period with still the original block it is hard for me to take one side or another. It is clear that anywhere in the world populism is gaining because it is the desperate cry of people felt left out. Being true or not, it is how they feel. We are seeing the same situation here in the US and of course in France. The Netherlands have their share of concerns too.
    I prefer to focus on your gorgeous photos and adorable birds. Which reminds us of what really matters during our time on this beautiful planet earth that we should finally agree to share in peace and harmony.
    I understand your frustration with your memoir and also your decision to take some time away from your blog. I’ve been blogging less often to be able to finish the endless revision work on my new YA novel, currently out with an editor. Keep your fingers crossed for me!
    It will be a pleasure to read you again after the summer, Sherri. Enjoy and best to you and your family.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sherri says:

      Dear Evelyne, I had you at the top of my list to visit before I disappeared from blogland, but you have beaten me to the post! I have missed you, and am so sorry I haven’t been able to visit you as much as I would like, but I know you’ve been busy writing too. And yes, I am definitely keeping everything crossed for you! My goal is to have my MS out with an editor by September and I know the only way to achieve that is to take this blogging break. Yes, it is very hard to take sides on the EU. I was twelve or so when we joined what was then called the EEC, European Economic Community and also going from pounds, shillings and pence to decimilisation! The younger generation have always known us as part of Europe, and although in the end I voted remain for them and for other reasons, I hoped that if we did remain, that great lessons would be learned giving way to desperately needed reform in our country and our relationship with the EU. As you say, too much to comment on here, but I agree totally, popularism is gaining hold and for valid reasons. The gap with the haves and have-nots is ever widening and it crosses social classes across the generations. Unrest rules the ways on both sides of the shining sea. Now we all wait with baited breath to see what happens in the USA…
      I’m so glad you enjoyed the photos, I didn’t want to leave this post on a heavy note. There are many challenges and posts I would have liked to have taken part in but just haven’t had the time.
      Thank you so much for your lovely message my friend, likewise with reading you too and I wish you and your family a most wonderful summer – oh, and of course, a happy July 4th, a holiday neither you nor I grew up with but went on to share happily with our children, and one of which I have many happy memories 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  23. So wonderful to read your honest and heartfelt words about the Brexit Sherri. So much of what we hear is filtered through the lens of the US media outlets. What an uncertain time for the UK with many questions remaining. It always makes me sad when I see the statistics of how few younger voters actually get out to cast their vote. My dad was a firm believer in voting and I have yet to miss and election, even if it’s a single issue city ballot!

    So fun to see the grown-up pictures of Aspie D’s darling little chicks. I remember the picture of the babies from last year very well. Has an entire year really gone by?! I had no idea that raising them was such a delicate task. Glad to hear that (most) of them are doing well!

    You most certainly have a great deal on your plate caring for family and dealing with the change in care-coordinator for Aspie D. So glad to hear that you are prioritizing what is most important for you and focusing on that. Keeping up with the blog world is a full time job! Especially with all of your thoughtful and kind responses. Sometimes it’s nice—and necessary—to take a break. I look forward to staying connected via Facebook in the upcoming months Sherri 🙂

    xoxo Heather

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Oh Heather, your dad is a wonderful man with a wonderful daughter 🙂 I’m so glad I was able to express my feelings from the generational perspective. As you say, a lot of what we hear whichever side of the ‘pond’ we live on depends on what the media has to say about it. Troubling times for Britain, but keeping the faith that we’ll find our way. But what tumultous times for us all, and for your with your election this year…as we wait…
      Thank you so much for your kind concern for Aspie D. I’m so glad you enjoyed the quail chick pics, and yes, a whole year, I can hardly believe it myself!! I’m so glad we’re in touch over on FB and September will be here before we know it! I wish you and Matt a fantastic summer…look forward to hearing all about it! Take care my friend…and have a great July 4th too! 🙂 ❤ xoxo

      Like

  24. Such a lot to talk about in this final post before Autumn, Sherri. So much has happened in the last seven days. I don’t think anybody could have envisaged what would happen after June 23rd, 2016. I woke on the morning on the 24th June, as shocked as I’ve been for a very long time. The world seems to be changing around us. It seems to be like a ripple effect on a once still pond.

    I made my own ripple and started my Blogging break on Monday so I could concentrate on getting a short story collection together. I’ve done so much in the last five days to get that dream to become a reality. It’s shown me clearly how much of my time Blogging was soaking up. I will be back, but things will be very different. I’ve got so much done since starting my blogging break and the break has taught me a lot.

    I’m very pleased to hear you are on the same journey as me, Sherri. It’s lovely to have your company. I know you’ll stay in touch during your break, but so will I. 😃

    Speak soon.
    Hugh
    x

    Liked by 2 people

  25. Sherri says:

    Oh Hugh, I hear you, the shock of that Friday morning was unreal. My daughter had been up most of the night and came in to tell us at 5 in the morning of the news. We were dumbfounded. And now, as you say, the Brexit ripple effect is sending shock waves world wide. As for the turmoil in our government…but enough politics. We will ride this out somehow…
    I am so pleased that your blogging break so far has proven so productive and fruitful. I’ve taken a few short breaks over my 3 and a half blogging years, but this will be the longest. Last year you may remember I took about 6 weeks off to finish my first draft as I couldn’t get to it no matter how much I tried. During that 6 weeks I got so much done I was amazed. Blogging is wonderful, I love the connection and reading everyone’s posts with so much to share, learn and enjoy, but doing so while trying to write a book – and of course, live life! – is so difficult. Like you, I’ll be back, but will be forming a new strategy. Quite what, I don’t know, but let’s see. I love sharing this journey with you too Hugh, this time in our lives, so exciting, chasing our dreams of publication! And yes, I will definitely be in touch. Happy writing/editing, and see you soon! 🙂 xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Annecdotist says:

    I’m glad I caught you before your blogging break, Sherri, and hope you managed to catch up on at least some things over the summer. I think many of us were caught offguard last week and, despite not considering our blogs political territory, the shock and confusion has spilled into our posts. I admire the eloquence with which you’ve written about it, and of course the cheery photographs.
    So sad for you and your daughter in the loss of her care coordinator. Although I imagine you had lots of ups and downs as many do, these are vital roles in holding things together for vulnerable adults. Despite your gorgeous summerhouse it must, along with Brexit, leave you feeling doubly homeless. Hope we’ll all be less broken when we come together again.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Lovely to see you Anne, I too am so glad we got to ‘chat’ before I sign off, thank you for your visit 🙂 I have been very remiss in visiting blogs and barely managing to blog here with many weeks inbetween posts. So glad for the Ranch! Yes, I never wanted to bring politics into my blog, but how can we not share our heavy hearts when the consequences of the vote are so profound? And you are right, it is a double whammy. My daughter, as is typical with Aspies, hates change and this is huge for her. She had a great rapport with her care coordinator, and she trusted him. Her experiences before she started meeting with him left her not trusting anyone. And yes, there have been many ups and downs…we take the good days with the bad. But…we travel on and oh Anne, I do hope so very much that we find some measure of healing when we next meet. I wish you all the very best with your latest WIP (I still have ‘Sugar’ ready to read, once I emerge from my lost world of memoir…) and also will try to keep a hand in with the flash fiction when I can so will bump into you there over the summer. See you soon.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. dgkaye says:

    Dear Sherri. What a heartfelt post for your love of family and your homeland. Know that I wish you peace, and take your time to get through the things that need your attending to. Don’t worry about us, you know we’ll all be here when you are ready. ❤
    The photos are beautiful, and I did love the one with you and child and the American flag. Rest up my friend, and you know where to find me.
    PS I left you a longggggggggggg reply on Facebook. 🙂 xoxox ❤ Big hugs for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much for your lovely message dear Deb, and your longggggggggggggggg FB one too, lol 😀 Love it…you are a star my friend! ⭐ You’ve put my mind to rest and my worries about leaving the Summerhouse for so long. Well, not leaving it, just tapping away on the keyboard of my laptop furiously instead! Ahh…thank you… ❤ That little boy is my eldest son and we're standing on the deck of a place we rented for five years. Takes me right back, especially now that little boy is 6'4" and 30 something!!
      I do indeed know where to find you…and I'm so glad about that! Big hugs right back ❤ 🙂 xoxo

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Mary Smith says:

    Well, was it me? I’ve only just signed up to follow your blog and you say goodbye and stop blogging! Good luck with the book and I look forward to reading more from you in September.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Mahesh Nair says:

    Lovely post, Sherri. Hope all is well.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Pingback: Reflecting on Childhood Meal Favourites: Times Past | Reflections and Nightmares- Irene A Waters (writer and memoirist)

  31. Hi Sherri, I hope that you find that it is not the disaster that you are anticipating. Already from what I am seeing here markets are rallying and things are not looking too bad. You being on the ground may be seeing other things though so I do hope you find that really nothing changes. I do think the media hypes things up terribly.
    You won’t believe this but when we moved up here 4 years ago the retirement village dining room put lasagne on the menu and my mother was the only one who knew what it was. You having back then I’m not surprised no-one knew what it was, including me. That pheasant would have turned me off too. Lucky your mother didn’t choose him or you would have lived on road kill.
    Beautiful photos Sherri. They do brighten me up and I remember those little quail. Have a productive break and hope that your daughter doesn’t suffer too much from the change in worker. Take care. Will talk via other means until September. ❤ 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Thanks Irene, I’m sure things will settle down through the chaos once the Torie’s select their new leader and hoping beyond hope it’s someone equipped to negotiate with the EU to give our country the reform we need but also to keep in good standing. A big ask, but let’s see. And yes, the media certainly know how to through fat onto the fire. Haha…yes, that’s funny about your mother and the lasagne, and very surprising for this day and age! I was brought up to eat what was put in front of me so I don’t remember how I got the courage to refuse to eat the pheasant casserole. I seem to remember making myself beans on toast or something. Much more my cup of tea back then, lol! Living on road kill was definitely not my idea of heaven. Thank you so much for your good wishes, and so glad that the photos brightened your day. I didn’t want to leave the Summerhouse on a serious note. And yes, we’ll definitely be in touch and soon…and hopefully squeeze in a few walks too 🙂 ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • There seems to be a couple of impressive women standing so I hope you get one of them. Offal gave me the courage to back answer. Especially tripe. I knew someone who quite happily picked up kangaroos off the road to eat and we catered for a wedding once that was made up of road kill. Now that is a story I should tell sometime. Walking and talking sounds good in any medium. Have a wonderful break and will be in touch.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          Hi Irene, checking in here again after being away last week to reply to your follow up message and now indeed we have a woman prime minister in the form of Theresa May. I think she is the right person to bring us through brexit negotiations and glad that instead of having to wait until September faffing around for a leader, she can now get on with the job. I don’t envy her task though…
          Oh I would definitely have refused offal too…tripe is disgusting. I cooked some for my dog once, being told it was good for shiny fur, and even she, being a tough as old boots collie/lab and never sick in her 14 years, threw it all up down the stairs! My granny though swore by the stuff. LOL – a wedding feast of kangaroo road kill? That’s hilarious, and yes, that would be a great story to tell, I will be sitting in the front row when you do so!! Wonderful stuff. I’ll be over to you now to read your Times Past post, woefully behind…

          Liked by 1 person

  32. TanGental says:

    Well first up I hope the break is productive. And your family sorts out what your daughter needs. As for last week’s political machinations I really don’t believe many if any wanted the uncertainties and turmoil that has enveloped us, nor the racism etc, though some warned it would come. That’s not to say many leavers understood that would be one effect and saw a future after the turmoil. Oh well some put future control above current certainty. I’m not that sort of risk taker. I hope the uncertainty doesn’t last too long because until we get some clarity we won’t know from where we build.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Norah says:

    Best wishes with your writing, Sherri. I do you hope you punch your way through to complete your memoir. You have much wisdom to share. I am looking forward to reading more of your story. Loved your opinions here with Brexit. It wouldn’t have taken too many more Remains to vote and turn around the result. Silly people not taking their voice seriously. Sad too.
    I won’t keep you today. I’m about to fly away myself for a little while. I look forward to hearing from you when you are ready to return.
    Best wishes always. Loads of #SMAG hugs. xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Oh Norah, I’ve missed you! I planned to visit you today before I disappear, so it’s lovely to see you here first 🙂 Thank you as always for your wonderful well wishes and I will certainly do my very best to punch my way through. Wishing you the very best too with loads of SMAG hugs right back and I hope your fly away is for a well earned holiday 🙂 xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  34. Luanne says:

    So much to respond to here! Mainly, I am going to miss you while you are gone this summer. The photos are stunning, the baby quail ADORABLE (we have our own family of quail in our yard, and they are just as cute, but I worry about them all the time), and I’m so sorry about daughter’s helper turning in his notice. About Brexit, I don’t know what to say. My American friends all have opinions, but I don’t see how we can because how do we know what it’s like to live in the EU or without the EU (but as part of Europe)? All I feel I can do is listen to what the English have to say and try to imagine what it would be like. I’m so sorry. I do get the sandwich generation thing, though. I am now giving my daughter and my mother virtually the same advice LOL.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Yes, it’s a crammed post, ha! Brexit threw things for a loop. What is so troubling is that many here didn’t understand just how complicated it’s going to be to leave the EU and I think a lot of people are now saying they feel they were lied to by the brexit campaign and that the remain campaign was so badly run that we didn’t know the real facts, some of which are just now coming to light. A lot of us feel betrayed in several ways, not to mention the appalling behaviour of certain politicians…no names mentioned! Hopefully we will at least know soon who our next prime minister will be! Moving on to better things…thank you Luanne for your kindness and well wishes and yes, oh I will miss you too! The scary thing though is September will be here before we know it! Soooo glad you enjoyed the quail pics…they are fascinating birds aren’t they? I hope you find some cool relief in the weeks to come…and I’ll see you over on FB in the meantime. Hugs ❤ xoxo

      Like

  35. Prior-2001 says:

    Have a nice summer pause Sherri – it is a new year and more new seasons will come!
    I enjoyed hearing this info on the Brexit – wow.
    Oh and my mom made lasagna too – one of her 5 or 6 specialities.
    The English food items you mentioned sounded very yum and I love that elegant tea set. Looks antique and made me want to sip tea!
    But I know the kettle is always on -and our snacks will be ready on an Irish style tray! Ha! 🍪🍪🍪🐝🐝🐝 ((that is supposed to be Coolios and Flies!)) and did you know I have some Irish in me – I guess it is why we also have a liver for beer in our family! Hah!
    Lastly – the quails are super cute – xxoo

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      They will indeed! Ahh…always lovely to see you Yvette, thank you. I never wanted to get into politics here in the Summerhouse…much better to sit quietly with our Irish style Coolios and Flies…and I LOVE your little emojies, so cute! Ha…well, who knew about our Irish connection too…and yes, I’m thinking about that very same liver lol! I wanted to do a longer post about my growing up years with my favourite foods but this whole brexit thing took over, but I hoped to focus more on what is bothering me the most which is the great divide exposed in this country because of it. Now we need to come through this mess and move forward and be the better for it in all ways. We can hope and pray, that’s for sure. The tea set pic was taken at a tea shop, actually for my birthday a couple of years ago, with my mum 🙂 And glad you enjoyed the quail pics too. Have a great July 4th mon amie and we’ll catch up very soon 🙂 😎 ❤ xoxo

      Like

      • Prior-2001 says:

        Hi S -well it was a typo on the liver – was supposed to be love for beer – ha! But liver beer is a Freudian slip for sure – lol!
        And I was just telling someone else this – but when my son was in grade school one of his favorite books was called “eating the plates” – a simple little reader about pilgrim food and the author kept pages short and succinct and it will always be a special book because he loved it so much ((and u know how it is when the kids are emerging readers and to have a book grab them – whew)) anyhow – in the book they said that pilgrim kids Often drank a bit of beer with dinner because many times beer – a light brew – was the only purified drink available – and I bet it was refreshing !

        And yeah – politics are not my topic of choice – but I am glad that you shared what you did because I am learning a lot here!
        And speaking of food
        –/
        I hope it is ok to say this – but the topic of food is already being brought up – and well – when we I think of quail – I think of this amazing restaurant in Denver that serves the best quail! Mmmmm

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          That’s a great Freudian slip if ever I read one, love it! And what a cute, cute little book – yes, how great it is indeed when the kids find such a love for such a book – and I know in medieval times here all they drank was beer, light for the kids. Water was considered unpure, as was uncooked foods. Only the pheasants ate raw salad and veggies…and barely any meat. How times have changed eh? And LOL, no worries, quail is delicious and quite the speciality!!! (Shhhhh…I won’t tell D 😉 🙂 😀 ) Love reading your messages mon amie, you’ve made my day, thank you so much, and I’ll be in touch very soon…get those coolios and flies ready & I’ll bring the wine, chilled of course…but not too much for the old liver! 🙂 ❤ xoxo

          Liked by 1 person

          • Prior-2001 says:

            well whew – I am super happy that we are considering our liver mon amie – well very responsible of us! 🙂
            love those slips…..

            and when I used to teach about Henry VIII in the art room (portrait lessons about the use of shape – or maybe a clothing and style lesson) well I always talked about the huge waistline of Henry and how gigantic he was with gout and health problems – and this usually would lead into a nurtition lesson – and how maybe the boar’s head or ox tail fatty delights the rich (back then) only had access to – well maybe it was not the gift – maybe those “potato eaters” had the real gift as their digestive system was not all clogged down – and maybe the peasants had the enzymes and nutrient rich food with the food you mentioned.

            anyhow, have a great week and ttys

            Liked by 1 person

            • Sherri says:

              Seems so long ago we had this conversation mon amie…first time I’ve been on my blog to check in. Will email you very soon. Helped reading this, reminded me of how things were before I lost my dad. Much love dear friend ❤ ❤ ❤

              Like

      • Prior-2001 says:

        Hi again – Jenni shared this with me yesterday and had to share it with a few folks….
        She let go
        By r. Safire Rose

        She let go. Without a thought or a word, she let go.
        She let go of the fear. She let go of the judgments. She let go of the confluence of opinions swarming around her head. She let go of the committee of indecision within her. She let go of all the ‘right’ reasons. Wholly and completely, without hesitation or worry, she just let go.
        She didn’t ask anyone for advice. She didn’t read a book on how to let go. She didn’t search the scriptures. She just let go. She let go of all of the memories that held her back. She let go of all of the anxiety that kept her from moving forward. She let go of the planning and all of the calculations about how to do it just right.
        She didn’t promise to let go. She didn’t journal about it. She didn’t write the projected date in her Day-Timer. She made no public announcement and put no ad in the paper. She didn’t check the weather report or read her daily horoscope. She just let go.
        She didn’t analyze whether she should let go. She didn’t call her friends to discuss the matter. She didn’t do a five-step Spiritual Mind Treatment. She didn’t call the prayer line. She didn’t utter one word. She just let go.
        No one was around when it happened. There was no applause or congratulations. No one thanked her or praised her. No one noticed a thing. Like a leaf falling from a tree, she just let go.
        There was no effort. There was no struggle. It wasn’t good and it wasn’t bad. It was what it was, and it is just that.
        In the space of letting go, she let it all be. A small smile came over her face. A light breeze blew through her. And the sun and the moon shone forevermore.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri says:

          Thank you so, so much for sharing this with me dear Yvetee, it is the most beautiful thing I think I’ve ever read…and you have no idea how today, of all days, Tuesday July 12th in the afternoon, the timing as my first chance in a week to check in here…I really, really needed to read this…but then again, I think you did know… ❤

          Liked by 1 person

          • Prior-2001 says:

            I am so glad to read that – and I shared it with someone else via blog too – but I had hoped it would bring a smile – or a breath pf fresh air like it did for me.
            we were sitting in yoga and sweet jenni (you would love her) read it at the end – out of nowhere – she read something else this last Sunday too – but not nearly as potent as that “let it go” poem.

            xoxo and be in touch soon mon amie….

            Liked by 1 person

  36. Denise says:

    I love that you have included all the things that make your blog so special in this post – your past, your philosophical, open approach to life, family and politics, pictures of your garden, update on Aspie D… and I love the name Mooncake.
    Have a good summer, and enjoy your family, and your writing. You’ll always have a place in our hearts – hope to see you back in the autumn.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Denise! Always so great to see you again and thank you for your lovely, warm message. We’ve both been blogging a fair while now…where does the time go? Must keep in touch. Have a wonderful summer with your LDs and see you soon my friend! 🙂 ❤

      Like

  37. Your point about making sure you understood what the issues were while you were in the US even though you couldn’t vote – I suspect there are a few voters here in the UK that are beginning to wish they’d followed that path as well. Still, we are where we are and we can only move forward – when the politicians get their acts together.
    A break from blogging is a good idea. I did it myself earlier this year and was able to focus on other writing. I suspect I’ll be doing it again very soon. Hope it all goes well and look forward to seeing you back here later in the year, Sherri

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Graeme, thanks for your great comment. Yes, it would appear that way in brexit’s aftermath wouldn’t it? What a time of it these past couple of weeks, and now of course, we have Theresa May as Prime Minister. I don’t envy her task, but I wish her the very best in helping us recover from this mess. I was away last week and now getting down to the writing, while checking in at the summerhouse from time to time, so progress is being made, albeit slowly! I hope your upcoming break is productive and yes, look forward to catching up here too, but will see you on FB in the meantime 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Great post Sherri! I can feel your pain. Things aren’t looking much better over here on this side of the pond as far as politics go. I can so understand your need to take a break from blogging. I was forced to do the same recently to tend to my own family matters but it all works out in the end. I’ll be praying for you and Aspie D over on this side. All will be well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Lovely to hear from you dear Lilka, I hope you and your lovely family are doing well since your enforced blogging break. It’s tough isn’t it, but sometimes we need to do this and get things worked out. And yes, I feel for you too with the political upheaval over there… Thank you so much for your prayers and likewise, I’ll be doing the same for you and your family. Here’s to a good summer for us both…take care my friend, and I’ll see you in the fall 🙂 ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  39. A great passionate post Sherri, I agree with you on the aftermath of the referendum – I also voted remain. But weren’t you cosmopolitan, eating lasagne when it had barely been heard of here! Wishing you good things for your blogging break, I hope all works out well on the family front and with your memoir – try to get some relaxation in there as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you Andrea, and here we are, with Theresa May as Prime Minister! Who could have guessed?! Haha…yes, Mum certainly wouldn’t have made lasagne when she was still with my dad, he was strictly meat, veg and plenty of gravy, including a mug of gravy to drink! 🙂 I’ve been away for a lovely week with Mum and Aspie D in North Cornwall and now down to the writing at last. I hope your writing is going well and you enjoy a lovely summer – let’s hope for a bit more sunshine! – and I look forward very much to catching up with you in our favourite season, the glorious autumn 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  40. Ali Isaac says:

    Oh Sherri! Another blogger bites the dust? I’m not far behind you. I just can’t keep up anymore. I’m not getting books written, either. At the end of the day, we have to decide who we are, and who we’re doing it for. I too feel sad about the future our children have been landed with… better to be part of Europe than alone. Why don’t we just build a wall around our island? It affects evetyone, not just the Brits. If it was only ever about immigration, do they think this will really help? France and Ireland will not care 2 hoots about preventing illegal immigration into UK, and why should they work to help the British, when they have just said so emphatically they don’t want to work with Europe. Great Britain is just a dream, and clearly UK does not exist. Such shame. A beautifully written and we’ll considered post, as always. Good luck with your writing, and hope you have a lovely summer. Xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Oh Ali, it seems indeed that I’m not the only one. I had to make this decision and I know it’s the right one for this time. I hope you find your way too with the constant balancing act of blogging and writing, it’s very difficult to do both. I started writing my memoir at the same time I started this blog and now I know why you’re supposed to write your book, then start your blog!!! But I’ve learnt so much along the way, met so many wonderful people and wouldn’t change a thing. But now it’s crunch time! And yes, I agree with everything you say, it is just so sad what’s happened. Let’s hope that Theresa May can start the healing process, I fear too much damage has already been done, but would be nice to be proven wrong… Thank you so much for your good wishes, and the very same to you for a wonderful summer, but meanwhile, see you over on FB 🙂 xxxx

      Like

  41. Loved this whole post (we were quite shocked, too) about the vote and Irene’s challenge but I am happiest to read this: “I admit I am struggling and I need to take a step back to focus on my family and finishing my book.”
    I love to see this because as much as I love your posts, your words, I love you, dear lady and I am thrilled whenever I see someone I care about admit they are struggling and do something positive about it. We’ll be here. As always. Take care of yourself and looking forward to that book…whenever you get to it. ❤ Love, wine, and chocolate.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh dear, lovely Sarah, your kind, heartfelt words bring me great comfort and encouragement, thank you so much ❤ Love you back, loving the wine and the chocolate, and oh, the thought of you reading my book sends me to jelly (jello, lol!) as it makes it feel all that more real, that each day I write closer and closer to the finish line. Deep breath…and huge hugs…be in touch soon 🙂 xoxo

      Like

  42. simplyilka says:

    Dearest Sherri!

    You sure have a lot on your plate at the moment. And taking a blogging break can be really refreshing. I hope for lots of new fresh and cool ideas for your book after you look at it from a distance for a while. You know how much I love your writing. Your beautiful garden can surely help to inspire and relax. I also hope and pray that a new great possibility will show up for your super cool daughter. About the Brexit, I read you! I was really very very sad myself…
    I will miss you! See you back in September, Ilka

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Ahh, dearest Ilka, how I love your messages and wonderful spirit! I will miss you too, it’s typical isn’t it that as soon as you return, I disappear, ha! But..I will definitely see you in September and then, oh how I hope, I will be able to say I did it, I finished my memoir. I’ve needed to step away for a while, but now I’m back to the rewrites and edits and I feel the flow returning and the passion, which never went away, drives me forward even when I have to fight for that time to concentrate! Thank you so much for your kind wishes for my daughter, we are making progress. And as for brexit, yes, very sad…
      Take good care my friend, have a wonderful summer and I’ll see you very soon! 🙂 ❤

      Like

  43. Have a lovely break Sherrie. Great post I agree wholeheartedly about the EU vote. A worrying time ahead. Hope your daughter gets all the help she needs. Here’s to a productive summer – with your memoir. I’m doing my edits and hoping to have a book ready by autumn. It seems like a pretty insurmountable task so not blogging much. Those little quails are so cute. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Hi Marje…those quails are very cute 🙂 This is the first time I’ve been on my blog for many weeks. As you know, I lost my dad in July. Thank you again so much for your kind words. This past week I’ve started to feel a little better, I crashed after the funeral, lost in a fog of exhaustion and grief. Trying to wind my way back to my memoir which has lain untouched as I couldn’t do much of anything for a few weeks. I haven’t been on FB or any social media. Trying to make my way back…slowly…
      I so hope your edits are going well and all is on task for your autumn release, and enjoying a lovely summer. I’ve spent a lot of time with my family which has been wonderful and helped greatly.
      Thank you so much for keeping in touch…
      Love Sherri ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Glad you are starting to feel a little better Sherri. No doubt it will take time. It’s wonderful to hear that you have been able to spend time with family. We’ve had quite a busy old time of it. My eldest has beta edited my book and we’re halfway through the edits. Hoping for a November release…. My youngest has just had her GCSE results, which has been quite emotional as she had a mixed bag of results. (She struggles with exams but thank God managed to pass all her core subjects and has 6 GCSE’s in total. Including astoundingly good exam result in Eng Lit.) We hope to appeal on one of her favourite subjects that has been very harshly marked.) I am so proud of her – she tried so hard, and always gives her very best. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  44. Pat says:

    My heart shares your pain, Sherri, with the unsettling of events all around. It’s happening here in the U.S., too, if you listen to the news. It just hasn’t been fully realized, yet, until the elections. Here we are again feeling like we’re in the same place going through life and experiencing challenging problems together. Like you, I’ve not been blogging much this summer putting my attention on home and family and what’s going on around me.

    I love the photos and that you have such lovely places around you, the flowers, your quail and nature. Makes it all worth the living, especially when what we thought was secure isn’t as secure anymore. Know that my thoughts and prayers are with you, your family and the UK. Love and hugs across the pond. God has a plan. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Dear Pat, I have left my blog for so long and have only just now returned briefly to reply to your lovely comment. So much has happened since I wrote this post as you know, having lost my dear dad and grieving in the aftermath. Lying low with family and enjoying the good in life, and knowing that my dad was surrounded by love and knew total peace at the end, when I was able to be with him, was a very great blessing. Thank you so much for your kind, comforting messages. I hope you are doing well and continuing to enjoy the summer rounding it off with Labour Day weekend. It is a long weekend here too. I am just barely beginning to surface, I’ve been away from all social media. I hope to make my way back but I haven’t done any writing, only just now getting back to it as I can cope. I will be in touch…and meanwhile, I send you much love and big hugs from this side of the shining sea to yours. God has a plan indeed ❤ xoxo

      Liked by 1 person

      • Pat says:

        I understand about your absence and laying low, Sherri, with so much to feel and process with family. It sure puts the value of life in perspective. I pray you’re finding the comfort and courage you’re needing at this time.

        Been going through some stuff of my own this summer but in different ways. It’s making me lay low and reflect on a lot of things, too.

        Though different, I can understand and please know I’m sending my love and hugs as we work through these things in our lives. It will all be good for us at the other end. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

  45. Great post! I love the pictures, especially the baby quails!

    Liked by 1 person

  46. Dear Sherri. I was just thinking of you. I hope you’re having a most enjoyable summer and that all is going well with you and your family. xx ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      My dear Sylvia, I have missed you so much. I have only just returned to check on my blog after so long and I can’t tell you how wonderful it was to read your lovely message, thank you so much for thinking of me. I hope you are enjoying a great summer and your house is coming along well. Sadly, only a couple of weeks in on my blogging break, I took a call about my dad who was rushed from prison to hospital seriously ill. I had last spoken to him in May and I knew he was waiting for test results, but I didn’t hear from him and was getting worried. When I saw him in hospital he was dying and I went into shock as I wasn’t given any warning. It was pretty awful. Five days later he died, but I was with him to the end and he was surrounded by love and he was so peaceful in his last days and didn’t suffer. Since then, I’ve lain low with my family, grieving for my dad who I loved so much. I hope to return to my memoir and to put up a short post about my dad soon, as I recover. Meanwhile, your message feels like a great big hug and I could sure use one of those. Love to you my dear friend ❤ xoxo

      Liked by 1 person

  47. prior.. says:

    Hi S – I can email you later – but was in blog land and had to leave a hello – and some virtual tea for mon amie…

    coolios and….

    Like

  48. Tina Frisco says:

    My god, Sherri, what you said about Brexit is also true here in the U.S. “Every vote counts, each one. Otherwise our voice is just a whisper in the wind.” Only 47% of our population voted in the Presidential election. Many who were disillusioned when Sanders lost the nomination couldn’t bring themselves to vote for either Clinton or Trump, so they either didn’t vote or they split the vote and voted for a 3rd party. Thus, we have Trump. All of us, on both sides of the pond, are in for a rude awakening. But like you said, we need to pull together. My hope is that we will. Thinking otherwise simply does not serve. Courageous post, Sherri. Glad you spoke what many needed to hear. Love and hugs, my friend ❤ ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri says:

      Thank you so much for your feedback dear Tina, I really appreciate it. That protest vote is a dangerous thing. We are in for a rude awakening, that’s for sure, already starting as huge rows explode here over the legality of Brexit. And this is just the beginning. As for Trump…well…and then next year Germany and France have their EU referendum votes, with the nationlist and populist leanings growing ever stronger. That bumpy ride is going to last a long time…but, you’re right my friend, we must keep that hope alive in our hearts and pull together. Absolutely. Bless you Tina, love and hugs right back to you my friend ❤ ❤ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Tina Frisco says:

        We’re experiencing the death of the patriarchy, Sher. We’re at the peak of its dying, digging in its heels for one last stand. Things might get rockier before its toes finally point up, but they will point up. The cosmic changes occurring will force everyone toward a more sustainable way of being. We’re in for a bumpy (bumpier!) ride, but I’m just going to pretend I’m on an amusement park roller coaster, throw my arms into the air, and yell “Whee!” Of course I’ll continue being an activist for change, but hey, we’ve got 2 hands, right? 🙂 ❤ ❤ ❤

        Liked by 1 person

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